TribalPages.com  
Cenél Eóghain/Cenél Fearadhaigh-Bradley's of Lilly, PA


  Site Map    Guest Book   

Slideshow
Welcome! This website was created on Jun 30 2011 and last updated on Oct 22 2014. The family trees on this site contain 488 relatives and 104 photos. If you have any questions or comments you may send a message to the Administrator of this site.

Security

Family Members
Family Member Sign-In
-or-
Request Invitation


About Cenél Eóghain/Cenél Fearadhaigh-Bradley's of Lilly, PA
I in starting this site up with one thing in mind! That the WHOLE of the Family 
can and will be involved in as much as they want to have with this site and to give them the 
chance to enter information about their direct lines themselves.. With the opertunity to see the 
rest of our tree at the same time. I will be trying to lay out a complete as possible Family Tree 
with a complete trace of our Royal Linage in Direct line! AS always  my heart goes out to all with 
losses in the family and also wish them peace and Gods richest blessings! Carl R Bradley

Intro of the roots as it started in America for our family that came from Ireland.
Note: I find that many names was spelled incorrectly out of lack of education on the part of the 
people writing them!
***William Bradley*** Moved here from Cork, Ireland in 1822 and came here with his wife some 
children already born to them and 3 brothers! They Arrived in Philadelphia, PA and moved to Lilly, 
PA and 2 of the Brothers Traveled to and established Bradley Junction, PA. William Bradley 
Purchased aprox. 550 Acres of ground and set up home  he then also gave some of the land to the 
Catholic Church for a cemetary and for the Church Property to Errect  the Church of St.Bridgets; 
In Lilly, PA. USA.

The sons of Niall of the Nine Hostages included Eoghan and Conall Gulban, the progenitors of the 
Cenél Eóghain and Cenél Conaill dynasties of northwest Ulster. Referred to in Irish history as 
chief dynasties of the northern Uí Neill, the Cenél Eóghain and Cenél Conaill shared a common 
heritage as early sovereigns (cerimonial High Kings) of Ireland along with their cousins in the 
middle kingdoms of Midhe and Brega, i.e. the southern Uí Neill. 

There are many notable northern Uí Neill clans which included the various families of O'Neill, 
O'Donnell, MacLoughlin, O'Donnelly, O'Doherty, O'Cannon, O'Muldory, O'Kane, O'Gallaghers, 
O'Gormley, O’Flaherty or O’Laverty, O'Hamill, O'Lunney, O'Carolan of Clan Diarmada, among many 
others. 
 
The sons of Niall of the Nine Hostages, Eoghan, Conall [Gulban], and Enda, travelled north from 
the kingdom of Connacht into the western and northern regions of the kingdom of Ulster (county 
Donegal). It was here in the 5th century that the Cenél Eóghain and Cenél Conaill began to 
establish themselves as overlords in northwestern Ulster. The Cenél Eóghain established their 
power base at Inishowen and their capital at Aileach. The Cenél Conaill centered themselves around 
the rich area of Magh Ithe, in the valley of the river Finn. The two clans alternated as kings of 
the North up to the 8th century. The Northern Ui Neill also alternated with their southern cousins 
as so-called 'sovereigns of Ireland' into the 10th century. 

In the 8th century a series of victories were gained by the Cenél Eóghain over the Cenél Conaill 
in Magh Ithe (east Co. Donegal), splitting their power between the territories of Fanad, in the 
north, and Tir nAeda, in the south. By the beginning of the 9th century the Cenél Eóghain were the 
dominant Northern dynasty, as they spread their influence east into modern county Derry, pushing 
aside the Cruithin east of the river Bann, gaining control over the Ciannachta of mid-Derry, and 
steadily encroaching on the Airgiallan tribes of Ui Macc Uais. The dominance of the Cenél Eóghain 
continued as they drove further south, subjugating other Airghiallan tribes, and by the 11th 
century the Cenél Eóghain had moved their power base from Aileach to that near Tullahogue in 
modern day county Tyrone (named from Tir Eóghain, or Tir Owen). By the 12th century much of the 
area of Magh Ithe, and later that of Inishowen, was taken by the O'Donnells and O'Dohertys of 
Cenél Conaill. By the mid 13th century a leading family of the Cenél Eóghain, the Mac Lochlainn 
(McLoughlin), began to lose prominence to their kinsmen, the Ó Neill. 

There are many notable northern Uí Neill clans which included O'Neill, O'Donnell, MacLoughlin, 
O'Donnelly, O'Doherty, O'Cannon, O'Muldory, O'Kane, O'Gallagher, O'Gormley, O’Flaherty or 
O’Laverty, O'Hamill, O'Lunney, O'Carolan of Clan Diarmada, O'Quin, O'Hagan of Tullahogue, O'Devlin 
of Munterdevlin, among many others. Click here for a Physical Map of the Ulster region. 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cenél Eóghain 
Eoghan was the son of Niall who established his kingdom in Innishowen, centered at Aileach. 
Eoghan's sons included Muiredach, Binech, Fergus, Óengus, Dallán, Cormac, Feideilmid, Ailill, 
Echen, Illann, and Eochaid. Some of the clans of the Cenél Eóghain included those of Clan Neill, 
Clan Domnaill, Clan Birn, Cenél Fergusa, Cairrge Brachaidhe, Cenél Binnigh, Cenél Moen, Cenél 
Fearadhaigh, Cenel Tigernaich, Clan Conchobhair, Clan Diarmatta. 

The annals cite for the northern Uí Neill: 
For 465, Eoghan, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages (from whom are descended the Cinel Eoghain), 
died of grief for Conall Gulban, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, and was buried at Uisce Chain, 
in Inis Eoghain. 
For 527, After Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, son of Eoghan, son of Niall of the Nine 
Hostages, had been twenty four years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was burned in the house of 
Cleiteach, over the Boyne, on the night of Samhain the first of November, after being drowned in 
wine. 
For 557, The battle of Moin Doire Lothair was gained over the Cruithnigh, by the Uí Neill of the 
North, i. e. by the Cinel Conaill and Cinel Eoghain, wherein fell seven chieftains of the 
Cruithnigh, together with Aedh Breac; and it was on this occasion that the Lee and Carn Eolairg 
were forfeited to the Clanna Neill of the North. 
For 561, After Domhnall and Fearghus, the two sons of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, son of 
Eoghan, son of Niall, had been three years in the sovereignty of Ireland, they both died. 
For 562, Eochaidh, son of Domhnall, son of Muircheartach, and of Baedan, son of Muircheartach, son 
of Muireadhach, had been two years in the sovereignty of Ireland, they were slain by Cronan, chief 
of Cianachta Glinne Gemhin. 
For 601, The first year of Aedh Uairidhnach, son of Domhnall Ilchealgach, son of Muircheartach, 
son of Muireadhach, son of Eoghan, in the sovereignty of Ireland.
615 The O Brolchain Family 
  Notes from Reeves "Life of St. Columba," by Adamnan
XLVII - Flaithbertach  Coarb 1150-1175. [Introduction, p. clxxx]
Surnamed Ua Brolchain.  615, and belonged to the Cinel Feradhaich, a clan so called from 
Feradhach, grandfather of that Suibhne Meann, and fourth in descent from Eoghan, the founder 
of the Cinel-Eoghain race.  The Cinel Feradhiach are now territorially represented by the barony 
of Clogher, in the south of the county of Tryone.  The first of the O'Brolchan family who is 
mentioned in the Annals was Maelbrighde Ua Brolchan, styled prim saer Erren ["chief mason 
of Ireland"- Od Vers],, whose obit is entered in the ann. Ult. at 1029.  From him probably the 
masonic art of the family was derived, which was cultivated by Flaherty, and practiced by Donnell, 
with such success.  The next was Maeliosa, the lector whose obit is entered above at 1086. 
He spent a part of his early life at Both-chonais in Inishowen, in the neighbourhood of which some 
of his writings were preserved in Colgan's time; and afterwards he founded a church seemingly at 
Lismore, called the derteac Maeiliosa, "Oratory of Maeliosa," which was burned in 1116.  
He died on the 16th  of January, justly celebrated for his learning (Colgan, Acta SS. p. 108).  
His son, Aedh, succeeded him in the calling of professor, and died in 1095. Two years afterwards a 
son of Maelbrighde, surnamed Mac-an-tsaeir, who was bishop of Kildare, died.  Maelcolaim Ua 
Brolchain, bishop of Armagh, died in 1122; and Maelbrighde Ua Brolchain, also bishop of Armagh, 
died, Jan. 29, 1139.  The latter was probably father of the coarb Flaithbertach, whom the Annals 
of Ulster, aqt 1164, called Flaithbertach mac in epsuic hUi Brolcain, "Flaithbertach, son of 
the bishp Ua Brolchan," a lineage by no means in accordance with the delicacy of the Four Masters, 
and which, when copying the entry, they divest of its objectional character, in simply calling him 
Flaithbertach Ua Brolchain.  Domhnall Ua Brolchain was prior of Derry, and died Apr. 27, 
1202.  His name is inscribed on one of the capitals in the cathedral of Hy, in the form Donaldus 
Obrolcan (vid. 1202, App. III). Finn Ua Brolchan was steward of O'Donnell in 1213; and Flann Ua 
Brolchain was coarb of Columcille in 1219.  In 1548 died Sir John Obrolchan, rector of Kildalton, 
in Islay (Orig. Paroch. vol. ii. p 269) The name was afterwards writtten O'Brollaghan, and is now 
corrupted, in Ulster, to Bradley.  Through the influence of Gilla-mac-Liag of Gelasius, the abbot 
of Armagh, who had himself been previously abbbot of Derry (an. 1137) , Flaithbertach Ua Brolchain 
was raised to the dignity of bishop in 1158, as is thus recorded by the Four Masters: "A Synod of 
the clergy of Ireland was convened at Bri-mic-Taidhg, in Meath, where there were present 25 
bishops, with the Legate of the coarb of Peter, to ordain rules and good morals.  It was on this 
occasion that the clergy of Ireland, with the coarb of Patrick, ordered a chair, like every other 
bishop's, for the coarb of Columcille, Flaithbertach Ua Brolchain, and the arch-abbacy of the 
churches of Ireland in general." He was a zealous advancer of the welfare of Derry, and during his 
incumbency many important additions were made to its ecclesiastical buildings; to precure funds 
for which, the abbot had, during the years 1150, 1151, 1153, 1161, visited, and obtained 
contributions from various territories in Ulster and Ossory.  After a long life spent in the 
enregetic discharge of his duties, he died in 1175, at which year his obit is thus recorded by the 
Four Masters: "Flaithbertach Ua Brolchain, coarb of Columcille, a tower of wisdom and hospitality, 
a man on whom, on account of his goodness and wisdom, the clergy of Ireland had bestowed a 
bishop's chair, and to whom the abbacy of Hy (comhorbus Uae) had been offered (an. 1164), 
died in righteousness, after exemplary sickness, in the Duibhregles of Columcille; and Gilla-mac-
Liag Ua Branain was appointed to his place in the abbacy."
For 634, The battle of Saeltire was gained by Conall Cael, son of Maelcobha, over the Cinel 
Eoghain. 
For 650, The battle of Fleascach, by Crunnmael, son of Suibhne, chief of Cinel Eoghain, in which 
was slain Cumascach, son of Oilioll, chief of Uí Cremhthainn.
For 679, Dunghal, son of Scannal, chief of the Cruithni, and Ceannfaeladh, son of Suibhne, chief 
of Cianachta Glinne Geimhin, were burned by Maelduin, son of Maelfithrigh, at Dun Ceithirn. 
For 698, Flann, son of Ceannfaeladh, son of Suibhne, chief of Cinel Eoghain, was slain. 
For 698, Aurthuile Ua Crunnmaeil, chief of Cinel Eoghain was driven from his chieftainry into 
Britain. 
For 698, Flann Finn, son of Maeltuile Ua Crunnmaeil, chief of Cinel Eoghain, died. 
For 705, The battle of Leathairbhe was gained by Congal, son of Fearghus Fanad (sovereign of 
Ireland), over the Cinel Eoghain, where Maelduin, son of Maelfithrigh, Lord of the Cinel Eoghain, 
was slain. 
For 718, After Fearghal, son of Maelduin, son of Maelfithrigh, had been ten years in sovereignty 
over Ireland, he was slain in the battle of Almhain. Also fell Forbasach, chief of Cinel Boghaine; 
Conall Menn, chief of Cinel Cairbre. 
For 721, The battle of Druim Fornocht was fought by Flaithbheartach, son of Loingseach, and the 
Cinel Conaill, against Aedh Allan, son of Fearghal, and the Cinel Eoghain. Aedh Allan was 
defeated. These chieftains were slain on the side of Aedh, namely Flann, son of Erthaile, and 
Snedgus Dearg Ua Brachaidhe. 
For 727, A battle was fought between Aedh, son of Fearghal, and the Cinel Conaill, at Magh Itha, 
where Conaing, son of Congal, son of Fearghus, and many others of the Cinel Eoghain, were slain. 
For 728, A battle was fought in Magh Itha, between the sons of Loingseach, son of Aenghus, and the 
sons of Fearghal, son of Maelduin, where numbers of the Cinel Eoghain were slain, and Conchadh, 
son of Cuanach, chief of Cobha, was also slain. 
For 730, The first year of Aedh Allan, son of Fearghal, son of Maelduin, over Ireland. 
For 732, The battle of Fochart, in Magh Muirtheimhne was fought by Aedh Allan and the Clanna Neill 
of the North, against the Ulidians, where Aedh Roin, King of Ulidia, was slain. 
For 733, Aedh Allan, King of Ireland, assembled the forces of Leath Chuinn, to proceed into 
Leinster; and he arrived at Ath Seanaith. The Leinstermen collected the greatest number they were 
able, to defend his right against him. A fierce battle was fought between them. The king, Aedh 
Allan himself; went into the battle, and the chieftains of the North along with him. The 
chieftains of Leinster came with their kings into the battle; and bloodily and heroically was the 
battle fought between them both. Heroes were slaughtered, and bodies were mutilated. Aedh Allan, 
and Aedh, son of Colgan, King of Leinster, met each other in single combat; and Aedh, son of 
Colgan, was slain by Aedh Allan. The Leinstermen were killed, slaughtered, cut off, and dreadfully 
exterminated, in this battle, so that there escaped of them but a small remnant, and a few 
fugitives. 
For 738, Aedh Allan, son of Maelduin, fell in the battle of Magh Seirigh (i.e. Ceanannus), between 
the two Teabhthas, by Domhnall, son of Murchadh, after having been nine years in the sovereignty 
of Ireland. There were also slain in the same battle Cumascach, son of Conchubhar, Lord of the 
Airtheara (the Oriors); Maenach, son of Connalach, Lord of Uí Creamhthainn; and Muireadhach, son 
of Fearghus Forcraidh, Lord of Uí Tuirtre. 
For 751, The army of Leinster was led by Domhnall, son of Murchadh, of Clan Cholmain, against 
Niall i.e. the Uí Neill, until they arrived in Magh Muirtheimhne. 
For 754, The battle of Eamhain Macha was gained by Fiachna, son of Aedh Roin (king of Uladh), over 
the Uí Neill, wherein were slain Dunghal Ua Conaing and Donnbo. 
For 765, Niall Frosach, son of Fearghal, was seven years king over Ireland when he resigned; and 
he died at I Coluim Cille, on his pilgrimage eight years afterwards. 
For 766, There arose a dissention between Ceallach, son of Donnchadh, King of Leinster, and the 
monarch Donnchadh, son of Domhnall. Donnchadh made a full muster of the Uí Neill and marched into 
Leinster. The Leinstermen moved before the monarch and his forces until they arrived at Sciath 
Neachtain. Donnchadh, with his forces, remained at Aillinn; his people continued to fire, burn, 
plunder, and devastate the province for the space of a week, when the Leinstermen at length 
submitted to his will. 
For 774, A hosting was made by Donnchadh, son of Domhnall (southern Uí Neill sovereign of 
Ireland), into the North, so that he brought hostages from Domhnall, son of Aedh Muindearg, lord 
of the North. 
For 782, A battle (i.e. the battle of Ircoir) between the Cinel Conaill and Cinel Eoghain, in 
which Domhnall, son of Aedh Muindearg, was routed. 
For 783, Maelduin, son of Aedh Allan, King of the North, died. 
For 784, The battle of Claideach, between the Cinel Eoghain and Cinel Conaill, in which Domhnall 
was routed. 
For 793, The first year of Aedh Oirdnidhe, son of Niall Frosach, in sovereignty over Ireland. 
For 797, Aedh Oirdnidhe went to Meath, and divided Meath between the two sons of Donnchadh, 
namely, Conchubhar and Ailill. 
For 799, Aedh Oirdnidhe assembled a very great army to proceed into Leinster and devastated 
Leinster twice in one month. Aedh Oirdnidhe afterwards went to the King of Leinster, and obtained 
his full demand from the Leinstermen; and Finsneachta, King of Leinster, gave him hostages and 
pledges. 
For 800, Aedh Oirdnidhe went to Dun Cuair, and divided Leinster between the two Muireadhachs, 
namely, Muireadhach, son of Ruadhrach, and Muireadhach, son of Bran. 
For 815, Aedh Oirdnidhe went a second time with a very great army to Dun Cuar, and divided 
Leinster between the two grandsons of Bran. 
For 817, A battle between the Cinel Conaill and Cinel Eoghain, in which Maelbreasail, son of 
Murchadh, lord of Cinel Conaill, was slain by Murchadh, son of Maelduin. Niall Caille mustered his 
forces, namely, the races of Conall and Eoghan; and Cumusgach, lord of Airghialla, and 
Muireadhach, son of Eochadh, lord of Uí Eathach Uladh, mustered the Airghialla and the Ulidians; 
and a spirited battle was fought between them, i. e. the battle of Leithi Cam, in Magh Enir. 
Victory was gained over the troops of Aileach, by the Airghialla, on the two first days; but on 
the third day, when Niall himself came into the battle at Leithi Luin, in the vicinity of Leithi 
Cam, the Airghialla were defeated, cut down, and pursued to Craebh Caille, over the Callainn, to 
the west of Ard Macha; and the battle was gained over the Ulidians and Airghialla, and a slaughter 
made of them. 
For 821, The deposing of Murchadh, son of Maelduin, by Niall Caille, son of Aedh Oirdnidhe, and by 
the Cinel Eoghain. 
For 825, The violation of Eoghan Mainistreach, as to the primacy of Ard Macha; for Cumasgach, son 
of Cathal, lord of Airghialla, forcibly drove him from it, and set up Airtri, son of Conchobhar 
(half brother of Cumasgach by the mother), in his place. 
For 847, Flannagan, son of Eochaidh, lord of North Dal Araidhe, was slain by the Cinel Eoghain. 
For 864, A complete muster of the North was made by Aedh Finnliath, so that he plundered the 
fortresses of the foreigners, wherever they were in the North, both in Cinel Eoghain and Dal 
Araidhe. 
For 879, A hosting was made by the king, Flann, son of Maelseachlainn, with the Irishand 
foreigners, into the North; and they halted at Magh Eitir Di Glais, so that Ard Macha was 
plundered by some of the troops; and he took the hostages of the Cinel Conaill and Cinel Eoghain 
on that expedition. 
For 896, Maelbreasail, son of Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel Conaill, was slain in the battle of 
Sailtin, by Murchadh, son of Maelduin, lord of Cinel Eoghain.

1029 A.D.  Annals of Ulster
Mael Brigde H. Brolchan prim-shaer Erenn, mortui sunt.
Maelbrigte Ua Brolchain, chief artificer of Ireland, died.
 
1086  Maelisa Ua Brolchain, learned senior of Ireland, a paragon 
of wisdom and piety, as well as in poetry and both languages. His 
wisdom and learning were so great, that he himself wrote books 
replete with genius and intellect. He resigned his spirit to heaven 
on the seventh of the Calends of February, as is stated in this 
quatrain: 
 
   1.1] On the seventeenth of the Calends of February, 
   2] The night of fair Fursa's festival, 
   3] Died Maelisa Ua Brolchain, 
   4] But, however, not of a heavy severe fit.

1095  There was a great pestilence over all Europe in general in this 
year, and some say that the fourth part of the men of Ireland died 
of the malady. The following were some of the distinguished persons, 
ecclesiastical and lay, who died of it: Donnghus, Bishop of Ath-cliath;
Ua Manchain, i.e. thc Brehon judge, successor of Caeimhghin; Mac Maras 
Ua Caemhain, successor of Oenna, of the tribe of Dealbhna-Beag; Cairbre, 
i.e. the Bishop Ua Ceithearnaigh, successor of Maedhog; Ua Rinnanaigh, 
lector of Leithghlinn; Eochaidh Ua Coisi, Vice-abbot of Achadh-bo; 
Scannlan Ua Cnaimhsighe, anmchara of Lismore; Buadhach Ua Cearruidhir, 
priest of Cill-Dalua; Dubhshlatach Ua Muireadhaigh; Aedh, son of 
Maelisa Ua Brolchain, a chief lector; and Augustin Ua Cuinn, chief 
Brehon judge of Leinster.
1097 A.D. Annals of Ulster
Maol Brighde mac An t-Saoir U� Brolch�in saoi & epscop 
Chille Dara, & ch�iccidh Laighen, d��cc.  
Mael-Brighte, son of the wright Ua Brolcain, eminent bishop 
of Cell-dara and of the Fifth of Leinster, rested after most 
excellent penance.

1097 Flannagan Ruadh Ua Dubhthaigh, successor of Comman, and lector of 
Tuaim-da-ghualann; Maelan Ua Cuinn, airchinneach of Eaglais-Beag at 
Cluain-mic-Nois; Maelbrighde Mac-an-tsaeir Ua Brolchain, a learned 
doctor, and Bishop of Cill-dara and of Leinster, died.

For 1003, Aodh, mac Domhnaill uí Néill, tighearna Oiligh. 
For 1148, Domhnall Ua Gairmledhaigh, tigherna Chenel Eoghain. 
For 1164, Muirchertach, mac Néill, rí Ailigh & maithe Cenel Eoghain.
 Surnames of Scotland
  Black
  O'Brolachain
  Flaitbheartach Ua Brolchain was offered the abbacy of Colum-cille
in Iowa in 1164 (AFM, s.a.) but declined it.  Domhnall Ua Brolchain,
prior of Derry, perhaps a relative of Flaithbheartach, became abbot
of Iona and was builder of the Bell Tower there, or at least of the
lower part of it.  He died in 1203 (AU.). The mutilated inscription
in Lombardic letters on the southeast pier of the cathedral reads:
"Donaldus O'Brolchan fecit hoc opus."  Abbot Donald came of a famous
family of masons of whom the earliest recorded is Maelbrighde Ua
Brolchan, styled prim saer Erann, i.e. 'chief mason of Ireland.'
(Adamnan, VC, p. 405). He died in 1029 (A.U. s.a.) The rectory of
S. John the Evangelist at Kildaltane, Islay, was vacant in 1549
by the decease of Sir John Obrolchan (OPS, II, p. 269). Archibald
McBrolachin was one of the tenants in Iona, 1677, and Lauchlan duy 
McBrolachan appears as merchant in Campbeltown, 1778 (Argyll).
The name has been Englished Bradley and Brodie (Brody), although
these names have no connection with it either in root or
meaning.
1122 Maelcoluim Ua Brolchain, Bishop of Ard-Macha, died at the Disert 
of Doire, after the victory of forbearance and penance.
1139 Maelbrighde Ua Brolchain, Bishop of Ard-Macha, head of the piety 
of the north of Ireland, a paragon of wisdom, meekness, and 
mildness, after good penance, on the 29th of January.
1150 The visitation of Cinel-Eoghain was made by the successor of 
Colum-Cille, Flaithbheartach Ua Brolchain; and he obtained a 
horse from every chieftain, a cow from every two biatachs,
a cow from every three freeholders, and a cow from every four 
villains, and twenty cows from the king himself; a gold ring 
of five ounces, his horse, and his battle-dress, from
Muircheartach, son of Niall Ua Lochlainn, King of Ireland.
1155 Annals of Ulster
The door of the church of Daire was made by the successor 
of Colum-cille, namely, by Flaitbertach Ua Brolchain.
1158 A synod of the clergy of Ireland was convened at Bri-mic-Taidhg, 
in Laeghaire, where there were present twenty-five bishops, with 
the legate of the successor of Peter, to ordain rules
and good morals. It was on this occasion the clergy of Ireland, 
with the successor of Patrick, ordered a chair, like every other 
bishop, for the successor of Colum-Cille, Flaithbheartach
Ua Brolchain, and the arch-abbacy of the churches of Ireland in 
general. The bishops of Connaught who were going to this synod 
were plundered and beaten, and two of their people killed, at 
Cuirr-Cluana, after they had left Cluain, by the soldiers of 
Diarmaid Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Meath, and they returned 
to their houses.
1161 Another army was led by Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn into Meath, 
to attend a meeting of the men of Ireland, both laity and (Laity- I think means Royalty)
clergy, at Ath-na-Dairbhrighe; and he obtained all their
hostages. It was on this occasion the churches of Colum-Cille 
in Meath and Leinster were freed by the successor of Colum-Cille, 
Flaithbheartach Ua Brolchain; and their tributes and
jurisdiction were given him, for they had been previously enslaved.
1162 A separation of the houses from the church of Doire was caused by 
the successor of Colum-Cille, Flaithbheartach Ua Brolchain, and 
by Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, King of Ireland; and they removed 
eighty houses, or more, from the place where they were; and
Caiseal-an-urlair was erected by the successor of Colum-Cille, 
who pronounced a curse against any one that should come over it.
1163  A lime-kiln, measuring seventy feet every way, was made by the 
successor of Colum-Cille, Flaithbheartach Ua Brolchain, and the 
clergy of Colum-Cille, in the space of twenty days.

  Annals of Ulser

  A lime-kiln,wherein are sixty feet on every side, was made by 
the successor of Colum-Cille, that is, by Flaithbertach, son 
of the bishop Ua Brolchain and by the Community of Colum-Cille 
in the space of twenty days.
1164

The great church of Doire, which is eighty feet long, was erected 
by the successor of Colum-Cille, Flaithbheartach Ua Brolchain, by 
the clergy of Colum-Cille, and Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, King of 
Ireland; and they completed its erection in the space of forty days.

  Annals of Ulster 1164

  Select members of the Commmunity of Ia (Iona in Scotland, namely, 
the arch-priest, Agustin and the lector (that is, Dubsidhe) and the 
Eremite, Mac Gilla-duib and the Head of the CeliDe, namely, Mac 
Forcellaigh and select members of the Community of Ia besides came 
on behalf of the successor of colum-cille, namely, Flaithbertach
Ua Brolchain's acceptance of the abbacy of Ia, by advice of Somharlidh 
and of the Men of Airthir-Gaedhel and of Insi-Gall; but the 
successor of Patrick and the king of Ireland, that is, Ua Lochlainn 
and the nobles of Cenel-Eogain, prevented him.
For 1170, Conchobhar, mac Muirchertaigh Ui Lochlainn, tigherna Cenél Eóghain 
1175  Flaherty O'Brollaghan, successor of St. Columbkille, a tower of wisdom
and hospitality, a man to whom, on account of his goodness and wisdom, the
clergy of Ireland had presented a bishop's chair, and to whom the presidency
of Hy Iona had been offered, died in righteousness, after exemplary
sickness, in the Duibhregles of Columbkille; and Gilla Mac Liag O'Branan was
appointed in his place in the abbacy.

  Note:  this is the death of the same Flaithbertaigh Ua Brolchan
         mentioned in previous entries
For 1177, Aedh h-Ua Neill .i., In Macamh Toinlesc, ri Ceneoil Eogain. 
For 1197, Flaithbertach O Mael Doraidh .i., ri Conaill & Eogain & Aigiall. 
1202 Donnell O'Brollaghan, a prior, a noble senior, a sage illustrious for 
his intelligence, personal form, and comeliness, and for his mildness, 
magnanimity, piety, and wisdom, after having spent a good life, died 
on the twenty-seventh of April.

  Annals of Ulster 1202
   Domnall Ua Brolchain prior [of Iona] , eminent senior select for
intelligence, for form, for appearnace, for disposition, for
gentleness, for magnanimity, for benevolence, for piety, for wisdom,
entered the way of all flesh, after great suffereing and most
excellent penance, on the 5th of the Kalends of May [Apr. 27].
1213  Finn O'Brollaghan, steward of O'Donnell (Donnell More) went to Connaught
to collect O'Donnell's tribute. He first went to Carbury of Drumcliff;
where, with his attendants, he visited the house of the poet Murray O'Daly of
Lissadill; and, being a plebeian representative of a hero, he began to wrangle
with the poet very much (although his lord had given him no instructions to
do so). The poet, being enraged at his conduct, seized a very sharp axe, and
dealt him a blow which killed him on the spot, and then, to avoid O'Donnell,
he fled into Clanrickard. When O'Donnell received intelligence of this, he
collected a large body of his forces, and pursued him to Derrydonnell in
Clanrickard,---a place which was named from him, because he encamped there
for a night;---and he proceeded to plunder and burn the country, until at last
MacWilliam submitted to him, having previously sent Murray to seek for
refuge in Thomond. O'Donnell pursued him, and proceeded to plunder and
ravage that country also, until Donough Cairbreach O'Brien sent Murray
away to the people of Limerick. O'Donnell followed him to the gate of Limerick,
and, pitching his camp at Monydonnell (which is named from him), laid
siege to that town; upon which the people of Limerick, at O'Donnell's command,
expelled Murray, who found no asylum anywhere, but was sent from
hand to hand, until he arrived in Dublin.
1219  Fonaghtan O'Bronan, Coarb of St. Columbkille, died; and Flann O'Brollaghan 
was appointed in his place.

O'Clery's Book of Genealogies
Registered enter #'s not dates (609.607.609. 607.)
(col. d) Genelach Cheneil Feradaigh Beus .i. Muinter Brolchain

609. Maoil iosa m Mael brighde m Duib insi m Mael patraicc m
     Doiligein m brolchain (o ttat muinter Brolchain) m Elgine m Diochon
     m Floinn find m Maili tuile m Crunnmhaeil m Suibne mend m Fiachna
     m Feradaigh m Muiredaigh m Eoghain m Neill.

607. Maol brighde, dino, athair Diermada ocus Aedha et Muiregein
     et Maoil isa an cleiricc.

=======Translations=======

609.  Maoil Iosa son of Mael brighde son of Duff of the island son of
      Mael Patrick son of Doiligein son of Brochain (from whom the people of
      Brolchan) son of Elgin son of Diochon son of Flann find son of Maile
      Tuile son of Crunmael son of Suibhne mend son of Fiachna son of
      Feradaigh son of Muirdaigh son of Owen son of Neill [of the Nine
      Hostages].

607. Maol Brighde, futhermore, was the father of Dermot and Hugh and
     Muiregein and Maoil Iosa [d. 1086] the cleric.


      Pedigree of the Ua Brolchains


      Neill 'of the Nine Hostages'
       |
      Eoghain (Cenel Eoghainn)
       |
      Muiredaigh
       |
      Feradaigh (Cenel Feradaigh)
       |
      Fiachna
       |
      Suibhne mend
      King of Ireland
      d. 623
       |
      Crunmhaeil
      Chief of Cenel Eoghainn  650
       |
      Maili Tuile
       |
      Flann find
      Chief of Cenel Eoghainn 
      d. 698
       |
      Diochon
       |
      Elgine
       |
      Brolchain (O Brolchainn)
       |
      Doiligein 1053
      Royal priest of Armagh
       |
      Mael patraicc
       |
      Duibh insi
       |
       |                                                               
      Maoil Brigdhe prime t-Saoir of Ireland
      d. 1029                                                         
       |_______________________________                                   
       |         |      |              |                                   
      Diermada  Aedha  Muiregein      Maoil Iosa an cleiricc O Brolchain  
                                      d. 1086  

 Ballybrollaghan

 There is a Ballybrollaghan in Donegal, Banagh Barony, Parish of Inver.  Bally 
means "homeland," so this is a reference to the "homeland of the O Brolchains."  


        Census of 1659 - Donegal Inishowen Barony

        Principal Irish Names 

        O Barr (7), O Brillaghan (23), O Boyle (8), O Cally (22), 
        McCallin (15), O Callane & O Cullane (12,27), O Conagill (9), 
        O Carran (16), O Currin (3, 19), O Carny (10), McCollgan (30), McConway (6), 
        O Callaghan (8), O Doghertye (203), O Doy (6), O Deuer (8), McDevet (27), 
        O Donell (20), O Dermond (35), O Deveny (9), O Farran (14), McGlaghlin (76), 
        O Granny (6), McGillneske (8), O Gollogher (12), O Herrall (8), O Hegerty (23), 
        O Harkan (21), O Knawsie (9), O Kelly (11), McKay (6), O Lunshaghan (22), 
        McLaughlin (63), O Luog (9), O Mrisane (7), O Moran (6), O Mulloy (7), 
        McMurray (8), O Muncy (8), Porter (11), O Quigley (25), O Rodan (13), 
        O Sheale (8), O Towlan (14), McVagh (6). 

        Totals: Barrony of Enishowen: Eng. & Scots 453; Irish, 2678; 3131 totall.

        Kill McCrenan Barrony 
       
        Principall Irish Names
       
        McAward (6), O Boyle (15),O Brillaghan (8), O Canan 
        (9), O Cullan (6) & O Cullin (8)(14), O Colhoune (7), O Donnell 
        (27), O Diver (7), O Divet (10), O Dowy (6), O Dogherty (34), O 
        Fary (8), O Ferry (5), O Friell (7), O Ferill (9),        
        McFaden (7), O Gollogher (52), McGinnelly (21), McGee (11), O 
        Harkan (5), McIlbreedy (13), McIlchole (11), McIlbreed (5), 
        McKerran (7), O Mulvog (5), McPadin (13), McSwyne (39), O 
        Sheall (6), Wiltagh (6) 

        Barrony of KillMcCrennan: Eng & Scotss, 605; Rish, 1551; 2156 
        totall.


        State Papers - Ireland
        January-March 1601
        Number 127

        Handwritten Notes by Sir Henry Dockwra


        Inishowen

        The people are divided into septs...
        The chief septs are these:

        Sliocht Brian (the chief thereof is commonly chosen O Dohirty)
        Sliocht Donnell (Whereof at this time is chief Hugh Boy)
        Sliocht Brasleigh (whereof is chief Neale Oge)
        Sliocht Shane (whereof is chief Neale Crone)
        Sliocht Phelim (whereof is chief Shane mac Feradaigh)
        Sliocht Ross (wherof is chief Feradiagh mac Cahir)

        (Note: the above are all branches of the O'Doughertys)

        The Other Septs are these Four following, who but they
        be hold but as tenants or ... where the others are 
        Lords of senior noble blood as the leaders yet they are greater
        in power and wealth than many of the others and
        of them are commonly chosen counselors and officers
        to the Lord who holds them in great dignity.

        Clan Davids (whereof is chief Hugh Boy)
        Clan Laughlins  (whereof is chief Brian Ogge)
        Clan Allens (whereof is chief ....Ogge)
   *****Muinter Brallohan (whereof is chief Conner Moder)******
1665 Hearth Money Rolls - Donegal

  Inishowen Barony

      Moville Parish

      Aveny o'Brillaghan        of Balliaghan
      Torlagh o'Brillaghan            "          

      Culdaff Parish

      Owen o'Brillaghan         of Waskill
      Connor o'Brillaghan       of Glengal
   
      Clonca Parish

      Shan o'Brillaghan         of Ballekeagha
      Torlagh o'Brillaghan          "
   
      Clonmany Parish

      Hugh o'Brillaghan         of Donally
   
      Donagh Parish

      Shan o'Brillaghan         of Altoshein

Kilmacrenan Barony

      Kilmacrenan Parish

      Bryan o'Brillaghan        of Clonkilly
      Shan o'Brillaghan         of Gouldrum

      Tulaghferne Parish

      Bryan o'Brillaghan         of Ballikenny
   
      Augnish Parish

      Roory o'Brillaghan        of Carigault
   
      Taghboyne Parish

      Andrew o'Brillaghan         of Momein    

   
Raphoe Barony

      Raphoe Parish

      James o'Brillaghan          of Drumkeen
    
      Leck Parish

      Hugh o'Brillaghan           [no townland]
      Phelomy o'Brillaghan             "

Where Aileach Guards
      Brian Bonner
      Salesian Press 1974

        An Clann Bhrolchain: A Royal Line

        As a son of the O'Brolchain clan, Maol Iosa was born into
      a privileged environment.  The members of this line descended
      from Suibhne Meann, King of Ireland, and belonged to an elite 
      group.  They were part of the literati of the age and were found in
      positions of influence at Iona, Derry and as far south as Kildare.
      In north Inis Eoghain they maintained a position of standing right
      up to the English invasion in the early seventeenth century.
      Their descendants still survive there with their identitity obscured
      somewhat by the nondescript surname of "Bradley", an anglicised
      substitute.
The last documented Family member of title that we can find is:
State Papers - Ireland   January-March 1601
**Muinter Brallohan (whereof is chief Conner Moder)**

Irish Flax Growers, 1796
Surname First Name Parish/Barony County 
Following are the exact matches: 
Bradley Owen Donagh Donegal 
Bradley James Kilmacrenan Donegal 
Bradley James Gartan Donegal 
Bradley Patrick Conwal Donegal 
Bradley Patrick Kilmacrenan Donegal 
Bradley William Moville Upper Donegal 
Bradley Thomas Leck Donegal 
Bradley Philip Tully Donegal 
Bradley James Fahan Upper Donegal 
Bradley James Conwal Donegal 
Bradley Edward Moville Lower Donegal 
Bradley Daniel Gartan Donegal 
Bradley Barner Aghanunshin Donegal 
Bradley Francis Conwal Donegal 
Bradley Francis Kilmacrenan Donegal 
Bradley James Aghanunshin Donegal 
Bradley Hugh Moville Upper Donegal 
Bradley Anthony Moville Upper Donegal 


        Student, Sage, Professor and Poet

        Maol Iosa commenced his studies at an early age in the
      monastery of Both Chonais at Carrowmore in the parish of
      Culdaff.  With other students he walked and played by the banks
      of the nearby river Deel which flows now, as then, on its meandering
      course from Gleneely to the sea at Culdaff.  Longer outings
      were made to the wild and desolate area to the southwest known
      as "Tir an Aoire", the land of the shepherd.  At times the summit of
      Cnoc Eachdroma, with its ancient fort, was the venue.
        Family influence assured him of access to the wider fields of
      education.  Armagh is on record as one of his centres of work and
      study.  Later he settled at Lismore where he could exchange
      thoughts with another fellow Inis Eoghain man, Scannlan
      O Canaimhsighe, already referred to above.
        Through his peoms with their religious themes his name
      became known throughout the whole of Ireland.  His literary
      productions show him as a man of learning and spirituality
      combined with a knowledge of and a love for the Bible as the
      inspired Word of god.  Many of his works were lost but a number
      still survive. The text of one of his best known poems, still in
      use, is set out below.

         A Plea for Love
         Maol Iosa O Brolchainn

         My God, assist me,
         Give me your love, Dear Son of God!
         Give me your love, Dear Son of God!
         My God, assist me.

         Into my heart, that healed it may be,
         Cast, Great King! your love today.
         Cast, Great King! your love today.
         Into my heart, that healed it may be.

         Lord give me, what I beg from you,
         Give me fully, O pure bright Sun!
         Give me fully, O pure bright Sun!
         Lord give me, what I beg from you.

         For this I hope and for this I seek:
         Your love for me wherever I am;
         Your love for me wherever I am;
         For this I hope and for this I seek.

         Thy love as you will,
         Give me liberally I say again;
         Give me liberally I say again;
         They love as you will.

         With no respite I seek, I beg from you
         My place in heaven, Dear Son of God!
         My place in heaven, Dear Son of God!
         With no respite I seek, I beg from you.

         Lord, Lord, listen to me,
         That my soul may be full of your love, O God;
         That my soul may be full of your love, O God;
         Lord, Lord, listen to me.


         Obit

         Maol Iosa died on Janurary 16, 1086 at Lismore after a long
      illness.  An oratory was erected to his memory.  He is included
      in the Martyrology of Donegal as a Confessor of the Faith.  Sean
      Mac Colgan (Joannes Colganus) states that he was a amn of
      virtue and holiness, famous afar in his own day and that noe one
      excelled him in knowledge and learning.  Perhaps the last word can 
      be left to the Annals of Clonmacnoise in the etnry for 1084
      (recte 1086).

          "Maol Iosa O'Brolchain, the elder and sage of Irelnad, was so
           ingenious and witty and withal so well-learned that he composed
           great volumes containing many great mysteries and new sciences
           devised by himself died this year."
 
 
 
 






--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

For further Cenél Eóghain reference, also see northern Uí Neill kings 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Clan Neill, included the dominant Cenél Eóghain septs of Ó Neill and Mac Lochlainn, as well as 
many other notable septs. The name O'Neill is said to originate with Niall Glúndub, a 10th century 
ancestor of the Uí Neill line. The reference here to Clan Neill refers to Neill Caille, his 
grandfather. Ó Neill and Mac Lochlainn are anciently cited as kings of Aileach, a base of power at 
the lower end of the Inishowen peninsula. By the 11th century the Ó Neill had established a seat 
of power at Tullahogue, co. Tyrone, and later became the dominant sept of the Cenél Eóghain. 

An early clann Neill (Mac Lochlainn) genealogy:   (Rawlinson) 
Domnall m. Ardgair m. Lochlaind m. Muiredaich m. Domnaill m. Muirchertaich m. Néill Glúnduib m. 
Áeda Findléith m. Néill Caille m. Áeda Oirdnide m. Néill Frossaich m. Fergaile m. Máele Dúin m. 
Máel Fithrich m. Áeda Uaridnaich m. Domnaill m. Muircherdaich m. Muiredaich m. Éogain m. Néill. 

An early Cenél Eóghain (O'Neill) genealogy:   (O'Clery) 
Eoghan m Neill oicc m. Neill moir m. Aedha m. Domhnaill m. Briain catha duinn m. Neill ruaidh m. 
Aeda m. Muircertaigh muighe lugaidh m. Taidhg glinne m. Conchobair na fiodhbaide m. Flaithbertaigh 
locha h-adair m. Domhnaill m. Aedha athlamhain m. Flaithbertaigh an trostain m. Muircertaigh 
mhidhigh m. Domhnaill arda macha m. Muircertaigh na ccocal ccroicenn m. Neill glunduibh m. Aedha 
finnleith m. Neill caille m. Aedha oirdnide m. Neill frosaigh m. Ferghail m. Maile duin m. Maile 
fithrigh m. Aedha uairidhnigh m. Domhnaill ilcealccaigh m. Muircertaigh m. Muiredaigh m. Eoghain 
m. Neill naighiallaigh. 

The annals cite: (see above citations for Cenél Eóghain) 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Clan Domnaill, of Cenél Eóghain. The name of O'Donnelly is said to derive from a great-great 
grandson of Domnaill, that is Donghaile. They were cited as chiefs of Feardroma, perhaps near 
Ballydonnelly, in county Tyrone. There is also a Fer Droma Lighen, a name remembered in the 
townland of Drumleene, Clonleig parish, barony of Raphoe, county Donegal. Of the same region, the 
sept of Cenél n-Echach Droma Lighen are cited in the Book of Ballymote and the Book of Lecan, 
descended from Eocho, son of Domhnall, son of Muirceartach Mac Earca. 
The O'Donnellys are later cited at Castlecaulfield, alias Ballydonnelly (Baile Ui Donngaile), near 
Dungannon, in co. Tyrone. 

The name Ua [F]laithbertaigh is associated as a king of Clann-Domhnaill in the Annals. Note: Not 
to be confused with Flaithbertaigh, king of West Connacht. 

An early Clan Domnaill genealogy:   (Rawlinson) 
Áed m. Néill m. Máel Sechnaill m. Máel Ruanaid m. Flaind m. Domnaill m. Áeda Findléith m. Néill 
Caille m. Áeda Oirdnide m. Néill Frossaich m. Fergaile m. Máele Dúin m. Máel Fithrich m. Áeda 
Uaridnaich m. Domnaill m. Muircherdaich m. Muiredaich m. Éogain m. Néill Noígiallaig. 

An early Fir Droma Lighen genealogy: (Rawlinson) 
Gilla Meic Liac m. Echthigirn m. Donngaile m. Cellacháin m. Domailén m. Donngaile m. Sechnassaich 
m. Cellaich m. Echdach m. Domnaill m. Áeda Findléith m. Néill Caille m. Áeda Oirdnide. 

The annals cite: 
LC1123, Conghalach Ua Laithbhertaigh royal heir of Oilech, occisus est. 
U1177, Gilla Mac Liac Ua Donngaille, chief of Fir-Droma, was killed, and wherein was wounded with 
arrows Domnall Ua [F]laithbertaigh—and he died of those wounds in the monastery [of Canons 
Regular] of Paul [and Peter] in Ard-Macha, after partaking of the Body of Christ and after his 
anointing and wherein were killed many other nobles... 
U1178, Domnall Ua Gailmredhaigh was deposed and Cenel-Maien gave the chieftainship to Ruaidhri Ua 
[F]laithbertaigh. 
U1183, A contest [took place] between the Gilla-riabhach Ua Flaithbertaigh and the son of Ua 
Gailmredhaigh and O [F]laithbertaigh was killed there and a party of the Cenel-Moien was killed 
there. 
LC1186, Dethronement of Domhnall, son of Aedh Mac Lachlainn, and installation as king of Ruaidhri 
O'Laithbhertaigh, by a section of the Cenel-Eoghain of Telach-óg. 
U1188 Ua Gairb (namely, Maghnus), chief of Fir-Droma, who laid [violent] hands on Ua Cananna[i]n, 
was killed by the people of Echmarcach Ua Dochartaigh in revenge of Ua Cananna[i]n. 
U1197, Ma[c] Craith Ua [F]laithbertaigh, son of the king of Tir Eogain, was killed 
LC1216, Mathghamhain O'Laithbhertaigh, king of Clann-Domhnaill, died. 
U1251, Ardghal Ua [F]laithbertaigh royal heir of Ailech, candle of the championship and 
hospitality of the North of Ireland, died. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Clan Birn, descended from Bern, son of Ruadrí, son of Murchad, a quo Muinter Birn, in the line of 
Cenél Eóghain, according to the genealogies in Rawlinson B502. In addition Rawlinson points to a 
son of Bern named Anféid, a quo Tellach n-Anfida, who was possibly the namesake for Tellach 
Ainbhith. According to O'Dugan (Topograhipcal Poems), the MacRuaidhris were among those over 
Teallach Ainbhith and over Muintir-Birn. O'Hart (Pedigrees) cites the name MacRuaidhri as MacRory 
or MacRogers, over the same territories, districts which he places in the baronies of Dungannon 
and Strabane, county Tyrone. Woulfe (Irish Names) agrees and also cites the family of MacRuaidhri 
as erenaghs of Ballynascreen, in County Derry. O'Hart goes on to cite, under the county Armagh, 
Muintir Birn, some of whose descendants anglicized their name Bruen, was a district in the south 
of the barony of Dungannon, adjoining the territory of Trough in county Monaghan. 
In Murphy surname history, there is mention of the surname Mac Murchadha (MacMurphy, Murphy), 
originally based in present-day Co. Tyrone, in the area known as Muintir Birn, but were driven out 
by the O'Neills and settled in south Armagh. The reference seems corroborated in various entries 
in the Annals, although the name Mac Murrough seems to be applied there, which may have later been 
translated into MacMorrow or MacMurray. 
In Colgan's Trias Thaumaturga, it mentions Ui Briuin, now Muinter Birn, alias Ui Briuinia 
Aquilonaris, in county Tír Eoguin, and diocese of Ardmache. This is an apparent reference to Ua 
mBriúin Archaille in Ui Chremthaind, a branch of Siol Colla dá Chrich, who were also noted in the 
Dungannon area. 
Note: Not to be confused with Muintir Birn, O'Beirne of Ui Briúin na Sinna, in county Roscommon. 

An early Clan Birn genealogy:   (Rawlinson) 
Cú Lacha m. Con Chaille m. Muredaich m. Fergail m. Muiredaich m. Birnn m. Ruadrach m. Murchada m. 
Máel Dúin m. Áeda Alláin m. Fergaile m. Máel Dúin m. Máel Fithrich m. Áeda Uaridnaich m. Domnaill 
m. Muircherdaich m. Muiredaich m. Éogain m. Néill Noígiallaig. 

The annals cite: 
U1120, Conchobor son of Flannacán son of Donnchuan, chief of Muinter Birn, was wounded in Sliab 
Fuait by the Uí Chremthainn, and died of it. 
U1166, Diarmait Mac Murchadha, chief of Muinnter-Birn, was slain by his kinsmen. 
M1172, Mulmurry Mac Murrough, Lord of Muintir Birn, was slain by Mugh Magennis and the Clann-Aodha 
of Ui Eathach Uladh. 
U1172, Mael-Muire Mac Murchadha, chief of Muinnter-Birn and chief and king of the Ui-Echach, was 
killed by Aedh Mac Oenghusa and by the Clann-Aedha of the Ui-Echach of Ulidia. 
U1181, Aedh Mac Murchadha, royal chief of Muinnter-Birn and the Airthir and the Cantred, was 
killed by Mac Mathgamna in treachery, at a meeting. 
U1257, Mael-Muire Mac Murchaidh, chief of Muinnter-Birn, was killed, namely, by his own kinsman, 
at Cell-issel. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cenél Fergusa, of the Cenél Eóghain, with territory later held south of the Sperrin Mountains in 
Derry. Fergus was a son of Eoghan, and ancestor of the O'Hagans, O'Quins, Ua Mael Fhabaill 
(Mulfoyle, et al) and O'Mallons (O'Mellans) among others. Ua hOgain (O'Hagan) and O'Maelfhabhuill 
are cited as chiefs of Cinel-Fearghusa in the Annals. Ua Mael Fhabaill is also noted as chiefs of 
Cairrge Brachaidhe, cited in the northwest part of Inishowen. O'Mellan's country was said to be 
originally in southernmost Co. Derry, and the sept is later noted in Co. Tyrone. 

An early Cenél Fergusa genealogy:   (Rawlinson) 
Ragnall mc Gillai Áeda m. Flaind m. Gillai Epscoip Éogain m. Ócáin m. Cináeda m. Máelgairb m. 
Ailella m. Cummascaich m. Donngaile m. Cuanach m. Conaill m. Brachaidi m. Diarmata m. Feideilmid 
m. Cairpre m. Cóelbad m. Fergusa m. Éogain m. Néill Noígiallaig. 

The annals cite: 
M1122, Donnsleibhe Ua hOgain, chief of Cinel-Fearghusa, and lawgiver of Tealach-Og, died. 
LC1215, Trad O'Maelfhabhuill, chieftain of Cenel-Ferghusa, with a great slaughter of his brethren 
along with him, was killed by Muiredhach, son of the Great Steward of Lemhain. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cairrge Brachaidhe. Perhaps named from Brachaidi mac Diarmata (or he named from it), the Cenél 
Fergusa held this territory at an early date. The Book of Lecan cites Diarmait, of Cenél Fergusa, 
rí Cairrce Brachaide. The sept of Ua Mael Fhabaill (Mulfaal, Mulfavil, MacFael or Mac Paul) are 
cited in the Annals as chiefs of Carrichbrack (Carrickbraghy) in the barony of Inishowen West, 
County Donegal. The Mulfaal sept claim descent from Fergus, grandson of Niall of the Nine 
Hostages, and are thus part of the Cenél Fergusa. O'Hogain (O'Hagan or Hogan) is cited as a chief 
in this region by O'Dugan (Poems). 

The annals cite for Cairrge Brachaidhe: 
For For 721, Snedgus Dearg Ua Brachaidhe, was slain in battle on the side of Aedh Allan, son of 
Fearghal, and the Cinel Eoghain. 
For 834, Fearghus son of Badhbhchadh, lord of Carraig (Cairge or Cairrge) Brach Aidhe, was slain 
by the Munstermen. 
For 857, Seghonnán, son of Conang, lord of Carraig Brachaidhe, died. 
For 859, Sechonnan filius Conaing, rex Cairgi Brachaide, died. 
Fir 878/81, Maelfabhaill, son of Loingseach, lord of Carraig Brachaighe (or Chairrge Brachaighe), 
died. 
For 907, Ruarc, mac Maol Fabhaill, tighearna Cairrge Brachaidhe, died. 
For 965/67, Tigernach mac Ruairc, ri Carce Brachaidhe, died. 
For 1014, Cú Dubh, mac Maol Fabhaill, toiseach Cairrge Brachaighe was slain by the Síl Taidhg i m-
Breghaibh. 
For 1053, Flaithbhertach Ua Mael Fabhaill, tigherna Cairrcce Brachaidhe, died. 
For 1065, Muircertach Ua Mael Fhabaill ri Cairce Brachaidhe was slain by the Ui Meithe Menna Tire. 
For 1082, Gilla Crist Ua Mael Fhabaill ri Cairrce Brachaidhe, died. 
For 1102, Sitricc Ua Maol Fabhaill tigherna Cairrge Brachaidhe. 
For 1166, Aedh Ua Mael Fhabhaill, tigherna Cairrcce Brachaidhe, was slain by the son of Néll Uí 
Lochlainn. 
M1198, Cathalan O'Mulfavil, Lord of Carrick-Braghy, was slain by O'Dearan, who was himself slain 
immediately afterwards in revenge of him. 
For 1199, Cathalan h-Ua Mael Fhabaill, ri Cairrgi Brachaidhe, was slain by d'O Deran. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


An Bredach, the territory of an Breadach (the Bredach, na Brétcha, na Brédcha, or Brédaigh) 
comprising the parishes of Upper and Lower Moville, barony of Inishowen West, county Donegal, and 
held by the sept of O Duibh Dhíorma (e.g. O'Duvdirma, O'Dierma, Dermond, or MacDermott of Bredagh 
Glen), a branch of Cinel Eoghain. 
An Ua Duibhdirma is cited also as king of Fordruim in the Annals, perhaps Fordrum naer Greencastle 
in the parish of Lower Moville, barony of Inishowen, county Donegal. 
Note: Not to be confused with Bredagh in Tirawley, Co. Mayo, where O'Toghda was chief. 

An early na Brétcha genealogy:   (Rawlinson) 
Domnall m. Áeda m. Cuind m. Cathail m. Duib Dírma m. Cathmoga m. Ruarcáin m. Duib Dírna m. Bicín 
m. Cuangaile m. Immainich m. Condálaich m. Toimtig m. Findchraid m. Fínáin m. Cremthaind m. 
Feidelmid m. Éogain m. Néill. 

The annals cite for Bredagh Glen and Dhuibh Dhíorma: 
M1043, Gillamochonna Ua Duibhdhirma, died. 
LC1122, Aedh Ua Duibhdhirma, chief of the Bredach, and head of the hospitality of the North, and 
Domhnall his brother, mortui sunt. 
U1167, Muircertach, son of Lagmand Ua Duibhdirma, king of Fordruim, tower of principality of all 
the North of Ireland, was killed in treachery by Donnchadh Ua Duibdirma and by the Bretach in the 
centre of Maghbile and two sons of his were killed on the morrow and a son was blinded. 
For 1178, Conor, the son of Conallagh O'Loony, assumed the chieftainship of Kinel-Moen; and 
Donnell, the son of Donnell O'Gormly, was banished from Moy Ithe into Inishowen, to Donough 
O'Duibhdhiorma. 
For 1198, Hugh O'Neill and the Kinel-Owen went to the plain of Magh Ithe, and plundered the Kinel-
Connell. From this place they drove off a vast number of cows, after killing (Niall) O'Duvdirma in 
a skirmish between the cavalry. 
LC1215, Donnchadh O'Duibhdirma, chieftain of the Bredach, died in the Dubh-recles of Colum-Cille 
(Penitentiary), in Doire. 
U1243, Aedh O'Duibhdirma, chief of the Bredach, died. 
For 1260, The battle of Druim-dearg, near Dun-da-leath-ghlas (Downpatrick) was fought by Brien 
O'Neill and Hugh O'Conor, against the English of the North of Ireland. In this battle many of the 
Irish chieftains were slain, including Conor O'Duvdirma, and his son Hugh. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cenél mBinnigh, of the Cenél Eóghain, descendants of Eochu Binnigh, son of Eoghan, included the 
O'Hamills, who advanced into Airghialla territory, northwest of Lough Neagh, as early as the 6th 
century. According to the Book of Ballymote, their branches included Cenél mBinnig Glinne (valley 
of Glenconkeine, barony of Loughinsholin, county Derry), Cenél mBindigh Locha Droichid (east of 
Magh Ith in Tirone), and Cenél mBindigh Tuaithe Rois (east of the Foyle, in ancient Tirone). 
Several branches of the Cenél mBindigh Locha Droichid are noted, in th Index to the Four Masters, 
in the north of the barony of Loughinsholin, co. Derry. 

An early Cenel Binnich Tilcha Óc genealogy:   (Rawlinson) 
Garbíth m. Cináeda m. Gillai Cuimne m. Con Bethad m. Domnalláin m. Garbíth m. Uaréirge m. Máel 
Fábaill m. Daithgile m. Con Galann m. Elgonaich m. Cobraid m. Máel Dúin m. Faílbe m. Ultáin m. 
Domnaill m. Laisreáin m. Echach Binnich m. Éogain m. Néill Noígiallaig. 

The annals cite: 
For 1030, Mael Dúin, mac Ciarmhaic, tigherna Cheineoil m-Binnigh, was slain by Conchobhar ua 
Loingsigh. 
M1053, A depredation was committed by Mac Lochlainn and the men of Magh-Itha upon the Cinel-
Binnigh, of Loch-Drochait; and they carried off three hundred cows. 
M1068, Flaithbheartach Ua Fearghail, lord of Tealach Og, was mortally wounded by the Cinel-
Binnigh. 
U1075, Cinaed grandson of Cú Bethad, chief of Cenél Binnigh, died. 
U1078, Conchobor ua Briain, king of Telach Óc and heir-designate of Ireland, was killed, with his 
wife, by the Cenél Binnigh of Glenn. 
For 1078, Conchobhar Ua Briain, tigherna Ceneóil n-Eoghain & Tealcha Occ was slain by the Cenel m-
Bindigh Glinne. 
M1081, Maelmithidh Ua Maelruanaidh, lord of Ui-Tuirtre, was slain by the Cinel-Binnigh of the 
valley (of Glenn). 
For 1081, Maol Mithidh Ua Maol Ruanaidh, tigherna Ua t-Tuirtre, do mharbhadh lá Cenél m-Binnigh 
Glinne. 
U1181, A great foray by the Men of Magh-Itha around O'Cathain, namely, Echmarcach and by the Cenel-
Binnigh of the Glenn, until they went past Tuaim [on the Bann] and harried Fir-Li and Ui-Tuirtri 
and took away many thousands of cows. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cenél Moen, of the Cenél Eóghain, from Máién (Moen, Moain, or Múain), son of Muiredach and 
grandson of Eoghan. Originally of Tyrone?, and then Magh Itha in the barony of Raphoe, county 
Donegal, the Cenél Moen were driven across the Foyle by the O'Donnells to the northeast of 
Strabane in the 14th century. Moen was the great-grandson of Niall [of the Nine Hostages] whose 
descendants included Domnall O'Gairmleadhaigh (O'Gormley), king of Cenél Eóghain in the 12th 
century. Other surnames included O'Patton (Peyton) and O Luinigh (or O'Loony). For O'Gormley also 
see Fir Maige Itha. 

An early Cenél Moen genealogy: 
Conchobar m. Mail seclainn m. Sitrec m Concobair m. Neill m. Domhnaill m. Edalaigh m. Conchobhair 
m. Domhnaill m. Menman m. MicRaith m. Gairmleghaigh m. Cathmaoil m. Mail mithidh m. Dalbaigh m. 
Gairmlegaigh m. Ferdalaigh m. Tendalaigh m. Edalaigh m. Faelain m. Colmain m. Maein m. Muiredaigh 
m. Eogain m. Neill. 

The annals cite: 
M1090, Giolla Criost Ua Lúinigh, tigherna Cenél Moen, was killed by Domhnall O'Lochlainn. 
LC1119, Conchobhar O'Gairmleghaigh, chief of Cenel-Moain, was slain by the Uí-Dubhda, and by the 
Clann-Flaithbhertaigh. 
U1128, The men of Magh Itha, i.e. Domnall ua Gailmredhaigh, and the Cenél Moain stormed a house 
against the king of Fir Manach, i.e. Faelán ua Duibdara, and he fell by them, and a number of the 
nobles of the Fir Manach with him. 
CS1129, Magnus grandson of Lochlann, king of Cenél Eogain and the north, was killed by the Cenél 
Moain. 
LC1138, Maelruanaidh Ua Cairellain, kindling lamp of the north of Erinn as regards figure, 
understanding, and valour, was slain by the Cenel-Moain. 
M1160, Domhnall Ua Goirmleadhaigh, chief of Cinel-Moain, was slain by Maelruanaidh, lord of Feara-
Manach, and the chiefs of Cinel-Moain along with him, through treachery and guile, at the instance 
of Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn. 
M1178, Conor, the son of Conallagh O'Loony, assumed the chieftainship of Kinel-Moen, but was 
afterwards deposed, and the Kinel-Moen gave back the chieftainship to Donnell, the son of Donnell 
O'Gormly. After the people of Donnell O'Gormly, namely, Gilla Caech O'Ederla, and the O'Flanagans, 
treacherously slew O'Loony in Donnell's own house, the Kinel-Moen drove Donnell O'Gormly from the 
chieftainship, and set up Rory O'Flaherty as their chieftain. 
LC1178, Domhnall O'Gairmleghaigh was deposed from being chief, and the Cenel-Moain gave the 
chieftainship to Ruaidhri O'Flaithbhertaigh. 
LC1178, Domhnall, son of Domhnall O'Gairmleghaigh was slain, in treachery, by the sons of 
O'Flaithbhertaigh and the other sons of Domhnall; and Tighernan, son of Raghnall, son of Domhnall, 
and eight full biatachs of the Cenel-Moain, were slain, along with them. 
M1179, A peace was concluded by Donough O'Carellan and all the Clandermot with the Kinel-Moen and 
O'Gormly, i.e. Auliffe, the son of Menman, brother-in-law of the aforesaid Donough. 
M1180, Raghnall h-Ua Cairellan was slain by the Cenel Moen. 
LC1183, A conflict between the Gilla-riabhach O'Flaithbhertaigh and the son of O'Gairmleghaigh; 
and O'Flaithbhertaigh was slain there, and a number of the Cenel-Moain were slain there. 
M1232, Conor, the son of Niall O'Gormly, Chief of Kinel-Moen, died. 
U1261, Niall Ua Gairmlegaidh, chief of Cenel-Moain, died. 
M1280, Melaghlin O'Gormly, Chief of Kinel-Moen, and Conor O'Gormly, fell by the tribe of Teallach-
Modharain. 
C1281, Enna O Gairmlegaig, king-chieftain of the Cenel Moain, was killed. 
C1307, 1307, Maelsechlainn O Gairmlegaig, high-chieftain of the Cenel Moain, died. 
C1340, Maelsechlainn O Gormlegaig, chieftain of the Cenel Moain, died. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cenél Fearadhaigh, of the Cenél Eóghain, Feradach was the son of Muiredach, and great-grandson of 
Niall whose descendants included the MacCawells (MacCathmhaoil), as well as the Irish Campbells, 
of Cenél Fearadhaigh [Theas] in the Clogher area of Co. Tyrone. MacGilmartin were chiefs in the 
barony of Clogher, and one was chief of Cenel Fearadaigh in 1166. The Mac Fiachra sept of Cenél 
Fearadhaigh were known as MacKeaghery. 
MacFetridge was also cited as chief of Cineal Feradaigh (O'Hart Pedigees) in the north of Co. 
Tyrone where offshoots of the clan remained from earlier days. O'Hart also notes the clans of 
Maolgeimridh (Mulgemery, or Montgomery) and of Maolpadraig or Kilpatrick, who possessed the two 
districts of Cineal Fereadaidh (or Faraday), in the east of Tyrone. 

An early Cenél Feradaich genealogy:   (Rawlinson) 
Máel Íssu m. Máel Brigti m. Duib Indsi m. Máel Pátric m. Doiligén m. Brolcháin m. Eilgíne m. 
Díchon m. Flaind m. Máel Tuile m. Crundmáel m. Suibne m. Fiachnai m. Feradaich m. Éogain m. Néill 
Noígiallaig. 

The annals cite: 
For 626, The battle of Leathairbhe between Maelfithrigh, chief of Cinel Mic Earca, and Ernaine, 
son of Fiachna, chief of Cinel Fearadhaigh, where Maelfithrigh, son of Aedh Uairidhnach, was 
slain. 
For 631, Ernaine, son of Fiachna, chief of Cinel Fearadhaigh, was slain. It was by him 
Maelfithrigh, son of Aedh Uairidhnach, was slain in the battle of Letherbhe. 
For 1082, Uidhrin Ua Maoil Muire, taoisech Cenél Fearadhaigh, died. 
For 1120, Echmharcach mac Uidhrin taoiseac Chenél Fearadhaigh, do mharbhadh d'Feraibh Manach. 
For 1129, Giolla Chriost h-Ua h-Uidhrín, toiseach Cenél Fearadhaigh, do losccadh i t-tigh a 
altrann i t-Tír Manach i meabhail. 
For 1166, Mac Gille Martain, toiseach Cenél Fearadhaigh. 
For 1185, Gilchreest Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry and of the Clans, viz. Clann-Aengus, Clann-
Duibhinreacht, Clann-Fogarty, Hy-Kennoda, and Clann-Colla in Fermanagh, and who was the chief 
adviser of all the north of Ireland, was slain by O'Hegny and Muintir-Keevan, who carried away his 
head, which, however, was recovered from them in a month afterwards. 
For 1215, Murrough Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry, died. 
For 1238, Flaherty Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry, and Clann-Congail, and of Hy-Kennoda in 
Fermanagh, the most illustrious in Tyrone for feats of arms and hospitality, was treacherously 
slain by Donough Mac Cawell, his own kinsman. 
For 1251, Donough Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry, was slain by the men of Oriel. 
For 1252, Conor Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry in Tyrone, and many other territories, and peace-
maker of Tirconnell, Tyrone, and Oriel, was slain by the people of Brian O'Neill, while defending 
his protegees against them, he himself being under the protection of O'Gormly and O'Kane. 
For 1262, Donslevy Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry, was slain by Hugh Boy O'Neill. 
For 1346, Cu-Uladh Mac Cawell, chief of Kinel-Farry, was slain by Donnell Mac Cawell. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cenel Tigernaich, of the Cenél Éoghain. Tigernach, son of Muiredach and grandson of Eoghan was the 
progenitor of this clan, although the Book of Ballymote cites a Cenél Tigearnaigh as the race of 
Tigearnach, son of Eoghan, son of Niall. O'Mulfoharty, and O'Heodhasa (O'Hosey), were styled 
chiefs of Cineal Tighearnaigh in co. Tyrone according to O'Hart (Pedigrees). O'Hart's source was 
O'Dugan (Poems) who cites O'Maoilfothartaigh, over Cinel Tighearnaigh; and O hEodhosa, and O 
hOgain. 

An early Cenel Tigernaich genealogy:   (Rawlinson) 
Áed mc Muiredaich m. Donngusa m. Duib Uinsenn m. Ainbítha m. Máel Éoain m. Fogartaich m. Máel Roit 
m. Fir Móir m. Muirgiusa m. Cobthaich m. Tnúthgaile m. Dáire m. Sáráin m. Tigernaich m. Muiredaich 
m. Éogain m. Néill Noígiallaig. 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cenel Mic Earca, of the Cenél Éoghain. A grandson of Eoghan was Muircherdaich, sovereign of 
Ireland from about 504 to 527, who was also called mac Earca (after his mother). The Cenel Mic 
Earca produced a line of kings who were styled sovereigns of Ireland. Máel Fithrich, the son of 
Aedh Uairidhnach was styled as chief of Cenel mac Earca, and some (Hogan) have placed them in the 
vicinity of the barony of Clogher, co. Tyrone, as a result of Máel Fithrich's death at the hands 
of the Cinel Fearadhaigh. 
Note: Another Cenel Mic Earca has been placed, in the Book of Ballymote and elsewhere, in 
connection with Tír Ceara in Ui Fiachrach, co. Mayo. 

An early Cenel Mic Earca genealogy: 
Máel Fithrich m. Áeda Uaridnaich m. Domnaill m. Muircherdaich m. Muiredaich m. Éogain m. Néill. 

The annals cite: 
For 478, After Oilioll Molt, son of Dathi, son of Fiachra, had been twenty years in the 
sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain in the battle of Ocha, by Lughaidh, son of Laeghaire, and 
Muircheartach Mac Earca, among other nobles. 
For 486, Uel hoc anno primum bellum Graine in quo Muircheartach mc. Earca uichtor erat. 
For 489, Aenghus, son of Nadfraech, King of Munster, fell in the battle of Cell Osnadha fought 
against him by Muircheartach Mac Earca, among others. 
For 497, The battle of Inde Mor, in Crioch Ua nGabhla, was gained over the Leinstermen and Illann, 
son of Dunlaing, by Muircheartach mac Earca. 
For 499/502, The battle of Seaghais was fought by Muircheartach mac Earca against Duach Teangumha, 
King of Connaught. 
For 504, The first year of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, son of Eoghan, son of Niall, as king 
over Ireland. 
For 513, The battle of Dedna, in Droma Breagh, by Muircheartach mac Earca, and by Colga, son of 
Loite, son of Crunn, son of Feidhlimidh, son of Colla Dachrich, chief of Airghialla, where 
Ardghal, son of Conall Creamhthainne, son of Niall, was slain. 
For 524, The battle of Ath Sighe was gained by Muircheartach against the Leinstermen. where Sighe, 
the son of Dian, was slain, from who Ath Sighe is called. 
For 526, The battle of Eibhlinne by Muircheartach mac Earca. 
For 527, After Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, son of Eoghan, son of Niall of the Nine 
Hostages, had been twenty four years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was burned in the house of 
Cleiteach, over the Boyne, on the night of Samhain the first of November, after being drowned in 
wine. He was killed by Sin, daughter of Sighe, in revenge of her father. 
For 537/47, The battle of Sligeach by Fearghus and Domhnall, the two sons of Muircheartach mac 
Earca; by Ainmire, son of Sedna; and Ainnidh, son of Duach, against Eoghan Bel, King of Connaught. 
They routed the forces before them, and Eoghan Bel was slain. 
For 544, The battle of Cuil Conaire, in Ceara, was fought by Fearghus and Domhnall, two sons of 
Muircheartach mac Earca, against Ailill Inbhanda, King of Connaught, and Aedh Fortamhail; and 
Ailill and Aedh were slain. 
For 555, The battle of Cul Dreimhne was gained against Diarmaid, son of Cearbhall (sovereign of 
Ireland), by Fearghus and Domhnall, the two sons of Muircheartach, son of Earca, among others. 
For 557, The battle of Moin Doire Lothair was gained over the Cruithnigh, by the Ui Neill of the 
North, i. e. by the Cinel Conaill and Cinel Eoghain, wherein fell seven chieftains of the 
Cruithnigh, together with Aedh Breac; and it was on this occasion that the Lee and Carn Eolairg 
were forfeited to the Clanna Neill of the North. The two sons of Mac Earca were in this battle. 
For 559, The first year of the two sons of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, in the kingdom of 
Ireland, i.e. Domhnall and Fearghus. The battle of Gabhra Liffe, and the battle of Dumha Aichir, 
by Domhnall and Fearghus, against the Leinstermen. 
For 561, After Domhnall and Fearghus, the two sons of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, son of 
Eoghan, son of Niall, had been three years in the sovereignty of Ireland, they both died. 
For 562, The first year of Eochaidh, son of Domhnall, son of Muircheartach; and of Baedan, son of 
Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, in the sovereignty of Ireland. 
For 563, After Eochaidh and Baedan had been two years in the sovereignty of Ireland, they were 
slain by Cronan, chief of Cianachta Glinne Gemhin. 
For 579, The battle of Druim Mic Earca, was gained by Aedh, son of Ainmire, over the Cinel Eogain, 
where was slain Colga, son of Domhnall, son of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach. 
For 600/04, After Colman Rimidh, son of Baedan Brighi, son of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, 
son of Eoghan, son of Niall, had been six years in the sovereignty of Ireland, along with Aedh 
Slaine, son of Diarmaid, of the Southern Ui Neill, they both were slain. Colman Rimidh was slain 
by Lochan Dilmana. 
For 601, The first year of Aedh Uairidhnach, son of Domhnall Ilchealgach, son of Muircheartach, 
son of Muireadhach, son of Eoghan, in the sovereignty of Ireland. 
For 607, After Aedh Uairidhnach had been seven years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he died at Ath 
Da Fearta. 
For 626, The battle of Leathairbhe between Maelfithrigh, chief of Cinel Mic Earca, and Ernaine, 
son of Fiachra, chief of Cinel Fearadhaigh, where Maelfithrigh, son of Aedh Uairidhnach, was 
slain. 
For 769, Badhbhchadh, son of Eachtghus, chief of Cinel Mic Earca, died. 
For 792, Muireadhach, son of Flann Garadh, lord of Cinel Mic Earca, died. 
For 828, Finneachta, son of Bodhbhchadh, lord of Cinel-Mic-Erca, died. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Fir Maige Itha - the men of Magh Ithe, a plain located in the baronies of Raphoe in modern county 
Donegal, which belonged early to the Cenel Eoghain. Various septs are mentioned in the area, 
according to the Annals, and in the 12th century this included Ua Gailmredhaigh of Cenél Moain and 
O'Cairellan of Clann Diarmada (both of Cenél Éoghain). The Ua Gailmredhaigh were expelled from 
Donegal, by the Cenél Conaill, in the 13th century, and afterwards settled on the opposite side of 
Lough Foyle, between Strabane and Derry. 

Note: Not to be confused with Magh Itha in Leinster, where the Book of Lecan notes Fir Maigi Itha 
have 7 Aicme [tribes], viz., Ui Deaga, Ui Setna, Ui Dimai, Ui Eircc, Ui Chormaic, Ui Niath and Ui 
Duirrtheacht. 

The annals cite for the term Magh Itha: 
M727/U733, A battle was fought between Aedh, son of Fearghal, and the Cinel Conaill, at Magh Itha, 
where Conaing, son of Congal, son of Fearghus, and many others of the Cinel Eoghain, were slain. 
M728, A battle was fought in Magh Itha, between the sons of Loingseach, son of Aenghus, and the 
sons of Fearghal, son of Maelduin, where numbers of the Cinel Eoghain were slain. 
U734, An encounter in Mag Itha between Flaithbertach son of Loingsech and Fergal's son - Aed 
Allán - in which the Uí Echdach of Cenél Eógain and others fell. 
M812, Gormghal, lord of Magh Itha, died. 
M843, A battle was gained over the foreigners by the king, Niall, son of Aedh, in Magh Itha; and a 
countless number fell. 
M957, A plundering army was led to Inis-Eanaigh by Fearghal Ua Ruairc; and the battle of Magh-Itha 
was gained, wherein Aedh, son of Flaithbheartach, heir apparent of Cinel-Eoghain, was slain. 
M993, Aedh, son of Dubhghall, son of Donnchadh, lord of Magh-Ithe, and royal heir of Oileach, 
died. 
U1011, Mael Ruanaid ua Domnaill, king of Cenél Lugdach, was killed by the Fir Maige Itha, [and] 
Aengus ua Lapáin i.e. king of Cenél Énna, by the Cenél Eógain of Inis [Eógain]. 
LC1016, Coscrach, son of Muiredhach, son of Flann, king of Feara-Maighe-Itha, [killed by his own 
people]. 
M1023, Lochlainn, son of Maeleachlainn, lord of Inis-Eoghain and Magh-Itha, was slain by his own 
brother, Niall, and the Cianachta of Gleann-Geimhin. 
U1050, A skirmish between the Fir Maige Itha and the Airgialla, in which Eochaid ua hOiséni fell. 
LC1053, A preying expedition by Mac Lachlainn and the men of Magh-Itha, against the Cenel-Binnigh 
of Loch-Drochait... 
LC1076, The victory of Belat was gained by Aedh Ua Maelsechlainn, and by the men of Magh-Itha, 
over the Cianachta, who were put to slaughter. 
U1080, The defeat of Áth Ergail beside Clochar was inflicted on the Fir Manach by Domnall ua 
Lochlainn and the men of Magh Itha... 
U1128, The men of Magh Itha, i.e. Domnall ua Gailmredhaigh, and the Cenél Moain stormed a house 
against the king of Fir Manach, i.e. Faelán ua Duibdara. 
LC1135, Ruaidhri O'Canannain, king of Cenel-Conaill, a war-like, defensive man, of charity and 
humanity, was slain by the men of Magh-Itha, viz., by Maelruanaidh O'Cairellan, and by Clann-
Diarmada. 
M1135, Ruaidhri Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, warlike and defensive pillar of charity and 
humanity, was slain by the men of Magh-Itha, namely, by Maelruanaidh Ua Caireallain and the Clann-
Diarmada, after which a great slaughter was made of the Cinel-Eoghain by the Cinel-Conaill. 
M1136, Conchobhar, son of Domhnall Ua Lochlainn, who was first lord of Aileach, and king of all 
the north, both Cinel-Conaill and Cinel-Eoghain, Ulidians and Airghialla, and also royal heir of 
Ireland, was killed by the men of Magh-Itha, by treachery. 
U1177, Niall Ua Gailmredhaigh, king of the Men of Magh-Itha and of Cenel-Ennai, was killed by 
Donnchadh Ua Cairella[i]n and by the Clan-Diarmata, in the centre of Daire of Colum-cille. 
U1178, Conchobur, son of Conallach Ua Luinigh, took the chieftaincy of Cenel-Maien and Domnall, 
son of Domnall Ua Gailmredhaigh, was expelled from Magh-Itha into Inis-Eogain, to Donnchadh Ua 
Duibdirma. The Cenel-Maien, however, in the same year, namely, before the end of one quarter, 
deposed the son of Conallach and gave the chieftaincy to Domnall, son of Domnall. 
U1181, A great foray by the Men of Magh-Itha around O'Cathain, namely, Echmarcach and by the Cenel-
Binnigh of the Glenn, until they went past Tuaim [on the Bann] and harried Fir-Li and Ui-Tuirtri 
and took away many thousands of cows. 
M1198, Hugh O'Neill and the Kinel-Owen made a second incursion into the plain of Moy Itha, to give 
battle to the Kinel-Connell; but the Kinel-Connell left their camp to them, upon which terms of 
peace and friendship were agreed on between the parties. 
U1199, Great war between [Cenel-]Cona[i]ll and [Cenel-]Eoga[i]n, so that Cenel-Conaill gave the 
king ship to Ua Eicnigh. Then he came to meet them to the Termonn of [St.] Dabeoc. Ua Neill with 
the Men of Magh-Itha came against him, to prevent him, so that each of them saw the other. And Ua 
Eicnigh was defeated and left pledges. From here Aedh Ua Neill and the Cenel-Eogain [went] on the 
same day, until they harried Cenel-Conaill around the Plain of Magh-Itha and took countless cattle-
spoil away with them. And it is on that foray Niall Ua Duibhdirma was killed on a surprise party. 
After that, a hosting [was made] by Aedh Ua Neill and by the Cenel-Eogain to the Plain of Magh-
Itha, to give battle to the Cenel-Conaill, so that the Cenel-Conaill abandoned the camp and they 
made a kind of peace then. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Clan Conchobhair, of the Cenél Éoghain, said to be originally of Magh Ithe and certain septs 
moving into county Derry about the 10th-11th century. Conchobhar was the son of Fergal, and the 
great-great grandson of Aedh Uairidhnach, whose descendants included O'Cathain (O'Kane and 
O'Cane), O'Mullan, MacCloskey and the Clan Diarmatta. The O'Kanes were lords of Creeve (Coleraine 
area) and Keenaght beginning about the 12th century when they overshadowed the O'Connors of 
Glengiven (modern Dungiven), and Fir na Craoibhe. 

An early Clan Conchobuir [Fer Maige Ítha] genealogy:   (Rawlinson) 
Máel Ruanaid m. Áeda m. Ruaidrí m. Óengusa m. Cairelláin m. Baígill m. Diarmata m. Conchobuir m. 
Fergaile m. Máele Dúin m. Máel Fithrich m. Áeda Uaridnaich m. Domnaill m. Muircherdaich m. 
Muiredaich m. Éogain m. Néill Noígiallaig. 

The annals cite for the O'Kanes: 
M1138, Raghnall, son of Imhar Ua Cathain, lord of the Craebh, Cianachta, and Fir-Li, fell through 
treachery and guile, by the Ui-Eoghain of the Valley. 
For 1156, Aedh, mac Ruaidhri Uí Chanannáin, tigherna Cenel c-Conaill, do mharbhadh lá h-Ua 
gCatháin, & lá Fearaibh na Craoibhe tria meabhail. 
For 1175, The Kinel-Enda were defeated, and a great slaughter made of them by Eachmarcach O'Kane, 
and Niall O'Gormly. 
For 1181, The men of Moy-Ithe, together with O'Kane Eachmarcach, and the Kinel-Binny of the 
Valley, mustered an army, and crossed Toome. They plundered all the territories of Firlee and Hy-
Tuirtre, and carried off many thousands of cows. 
MCB1183, Defeat and, slaughter [inflicted] by John de Courcy at Cúil an Tuaiscirt on Cinéal 
Eóghain, [Cinéal] Conaill, and Cianachta, and Giolla Críost Ó Cathain, son of the king of Fir na 
Craoibhe, and Raghnall Ó Brisléin, chieftain of Fána, were killed. 
For 1192, The doorway of the refectory of Duv-regles-Columbkille was made by O'Kane, of Creeve, 
and the daughter of O'Henery. 
For 1195, Eachmarcach O'Kane died in St. Paul's church. 
For 1196, Murtough, the son of Murtough O'Loughlin, Lord of Kinel-Owen, was killed by Donough, the 
son of Blosky O'Kane, at the instigation of the Kinel-Owen 
MCB1197, Conchobhar Ó Cathain, king of Fir na Craoibhe and Cianachta, fell ... 
U1206, Maghnus Ua Cathain, son of the king of Ciannachta and Fir-na-craibhe, tower of championship 
and courage of the North, fell by the wound of an arrow. 
U1213, Ferghal Ua Cathain, king of Ciannachta and Firna-craibhe, was killed by the Foreigners. 
For 1247, Eachmarcach O'Kane, Lord of Kienaghta and Firnacreeva, was slain by Manus O'Kane, after 
having gone on a predatory excursion into his country as far as Armoy in Dal-Riada. 
For 1260, The battle of Druim-dearg, near Dun-da-leath-ghlas Downpatrick was fought by Brien 
O'Neill and Hugh O'Conor, against the English of the North of Ireland. In this battle many of the 
Irish chieftains were slain. In a word, fifteen of the chiefs of the family of O'Kane were slain 
on the field, including Hugh O'Kane and Murtough O'Kane. 
For 1303 , Donn O'Kane, Lord of Firnacreeva and Kienaghta, was slain during the long war between 
two sons of Donnell Oge O'Donnell, Turlough and Hugh. 
For 1349, Rory O'Kane, Lord of Creeve and Ard-Keanaghta, died. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Ciannachta of Glenn Geimin, of Clann Cian, the O Conchubhair Ciannachta occupied the area of 
Glinne Gemin (Glengiven, barony of Keenaght, County Derry) with authority from about the 5th 
century, and were succeeded by the O'Cathains in the 12th century. For more information on the 
lineage of the Ciannachta, also see Ciannachta Breagh. 

An early Ciannachta Glinni Gaimen genealogy:   (Rawlinson) 
Conchobor m. Donnchada m. Galaich m. Diarmata m. Conchobuir m. Duind Chuain m. Condálaich m. Máel 
Fathardaig m. Conchobuir m. Taidg Temin m. Cind Fáelad m. Suibne m. Faílbe m. Ernáine m. Crachíne 
m. Cormaic m. Eircc m. Etchon m. Findcháin (is é cétnandgab Glenn Gaimen) m. Féicc m. Imchada m. 
Condlai m. Taidgg m. Céin m. Ailella Auluimb. 

The annals cite for the Ciannachta of Glenn Geimin: 
M563, After Eochaidh and Baedan had been two years in the sovereignty of Ireland, they were slain 
by Cronan, chief of Cianachta Glinne Gemhin. 
U572, The slaying of two descendants of Muiredach i.e. Baetán son of Muirchertach and Echaid son 
of Domnall son of Muirchertach Mac Erca, in the third year of their reign. Crónán son of 
Tigernach, king of the Ciannachta of Glenn Geimin, was their slayer. 
U616, Death of Suibne son of Crechéne, king of Ciannachta Glinne Geimin 
CS681, Cenn Faelad son of Suibne, king of the Ciannachta of Glenn Geimin, died. 
CS681, Mael Dúin son of Mael Fithrich was slain by the Ciannachta of Glenn Geimin and by Flann 
Finn son of Mael Tuile. 
U702, Ailill son of Cenn Faelad, king of Ciannachta, died. (Ulster?) 
M752, Tomaltach, Lord of Cianachta Glinne Geimhin, died. 
M755, Conchobhar grandson of Tadhg Teimhin, Lord of Ciannachta Glinne Geimhin, died. 
U757, Fergus son of Congal, Tomaltach, king of Ciannachta Glinne Gaimin, the anchorite Cuidgal, 
Aildobur, abbot of Muiccert, died. 
M881, Donnchuan, son of Conghalach, lord of Cianachta Glinne Geimhin, died. 
M925, Goach, son of Dubhroa, lord of Cianachta-Glinne-Geimhin, was slain by Muircheartach, son of 
Niall. 
U1015, Donnchad ua Goaigh, king of Ciannachta, was killed by the Cenél Eógain. 
M1022, Domhnall, grandson of Murchadh Glunillar, lord of the North, was slain by the Cianachta of 
Gleann-Geimhin. 
M1023, Lochlainn, son of Maeleachlainn, lord of Inis-Eoghain and Magh-Itha, was slain by his own 
brother, Niall, and the Cianachta of Gleann-Geimhin. 
LC1094, Conchobhar O'Conchobhair, king of Cianachta, in poenitentia mortuus est. 
M1095, Ua Conchobhair, lord of Cianachta-Glinne-Geimhin, was slain. 
M1096, Conchobhar Ua hAinniarraidh, lord of Cianachta, and Ua Cein, lord of Ui-Mic-Cairthinn, fell 
by each other in a combat. (Ulster?) 
LC1100, Echri Ua Maelmuire, king of Cianachta, was slain by Ua Conchobhair of Cianachta-Glinne -
Geimhin. 
LC1104, Donnchadh Ua Conchobhair, King of Cianachta, was slain by his own people. 
M1121, Gilla-Easbuig Eoghain Ua hAinniarraidh, lord of Cianachta-Glinne-Geimhin, was killed by his 
brothers. 
U1197, A hosting by John De-Courcy with the Foreigners of Ulidia to Ess-craibhe, so that they 
built the castle of Cell-Santain [and] the cantred of Ciannachta was desolated by them. 
U1197, Mac Gilla-Eidich of the Ciannachta robbed the great altar of the great church of Daire of 
Columcille and took the four [five] best goblets that were in Ireland therefrom, including 'the 
gray son' and 'the son of light' and the goblet of Ua Maeldoraidh and 'the twisted goblet' and the 
goblet of Ua Dochartaich... And he was hanged (namely, at the Cross of the Executions) in 
reparation to Colum-cille, whose altar was profaned there. 
U1207, A hosting by Hugo De Lacy into Ciannachta, so that he burned the churches of all Ciannachta 
and seized cows to a countless number. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Clan Diarmatta (Clandermot), of the Cenél Éoghain, descent from Clan Conchobhair. The parish of 
Clondermot in County Derry is said to derive its name from this clan territory. An O'Carolan sept 
(O Cairealláin) as well as a Mac Ettigan (Mac Eitigen) were cited as chiefs of Clan Diarmada prior 
to the 13th century. 
Note: not to be confused with Uí Diarmata of Síl Muiredaig, in Connacht. 

An early Clan Diarmatta (Clan Conchobuir) genealogy:   (Rawlinson) 
Máel Ruanaid m. Áeda m. Ruaidrí m. Óengusa m. Cairelláin m. Baígill m. Diarmata m. Conchobuir m. 
Fergaile m. Máele Dúin m. Máel Fithrich m. Áeda Uaridnaich m. Domnaill m. Muircherdaich m. 
Muiredaich m. Éogain m. Néill Noígiallaig. 

The annals cite: 
U1090, Mael Ruanaid ua Cairellán, chief of Clann Diarmata, Gilla Críst ua Luinig, chief of Cenél 
Maién, were treacherously killed on the same day by Domnall ua Lochlainn. 
LC1117, Conchobhar Ua Cairellain was slain by the Feara-Manach. 
CS1132, Diarmait grandson of Eitigén, chief of Clann Diarmata, dies. 
LC1135, 17] Ruaidhri O'Canannain, king of Cenel-Conaill, a war-like, defensive man, of charity and 
humanity, was slain by the men of Magh-Itha, viz., by Maelruanaidh O'Cairellan, and by Clann-
Diarmada. 
LC1138, Maelruanaidh Ua Cairellain, kindling lamp of the north of Erinn as regards figure, 
understanding, and valour, was slain by the Cenel-Moain. 
LC1177, Conchobhar O'Cairellain, indeed, gained a victory over O'Maeldoraidh and the Cenel-
Conaill, in which a great number of the Cenel-Enna were slain, along with the son of O'Serrigh, 
and many other chieftains likewise. 
LC1177, Conchobhar O'Cairellain, i.e. the chief of Clann-Diarmada, was slain ... by the forces of 
by John de Curci. 
LC1179, Peace was made by Donnchadh O'Cairellain, and by all the Clann-Diarmada, with the Cenel-
Moain, and with O'Gairmleghaigh, i.e. with Amhlaibh, grandson of Maen, i.e. the brother of the 
wife of Donnchadh O'Cairellain, ... 
LC1180, Raghnall O'Cairellain was slain by the Cenel-Moain. Donnchadh O'Cairellain was killed by 
the Cenel-Conaill. 
U1197, Ma[c] Craith Ua [F]laithbertaigh, son of the king of Tir Eogain, was killed and 
Maelruanaigh O Fercomais (or O'Cairellain), arch-chief of Clann-Diarmata, was killed and two good 
horsemen of his people were killed. 
U1207, A treacherous foray by the Cenel-Conaill into Ui-Fhearannain and into Clann-Diarmata, so 
that they seized cows and killed people. The Clann-Diarmata and the Ui-[Fh]airennain and the Ui-
Gailmredhaigh overtook them, so that a countless number of them were slain and a multitude were 
drowned. 
M1215, Teige Mac Etigen, Chief of Clann-Dermot, died. 
U1216, Oenghus Ua Cairrellain, chief of Clann-Diarmata, was killed by his own kinsmen. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cenél Aenghusa, of the Cenél Éoghain. I find little no reference to this group other than a 
citation in the Annals, and a similar reference in the Book of Lecan. 
Note: Cenél Aenghusa or Oenghusa was also a tribe name for the Mac Cana (MacCanns) who were lords 
of Clanbrassil in co. Armagh; and also the Cenél Aenghusa who were kings of Leth Cathail in county 
Down; and the name was also applied to the Ui Allmhuráin (O'Halloran) of co. Galway; and the 
Magennies of co. Down; and for one of the strong tribes of Dál Riada in Scotland; and for others 
as well. 

The annals cite for Cenel Aenghusa: 
U1095, Muirchertach ua Cairpre, chief of Cenél Aenghusa, and heir designate of Ailech, dies. 
LC1095, Muirchertach Ua Cairre, steward of Cenel-Aenghusa, and royal heir of Oilech, died. 
M1155, Amhlaeibh Mac Cana, lord of Cinel-Aenghusa, pillar of the chivalry and vigour of all Cinel-
Eoghain, died, and was interred at Ard-Macha. 
M1167, that part of the country of the Cinel to the south of the mountain (was given to) to Aedh 
Ua Neill, for two other hostages, i.e. Ua Maelaedha, one of the Cinel-Aenghusa, and Ua hUrthuile, 
one of the Ui-Tuirtre Ua Neill's own foster-brothers. 
LC1186, Gillachrist Mac Cathmhail, king-chieftain of Cenel Feradhaigh and the Clanns, (viz.: Clann-
Aenghusa, and Clann-Duibhinrecht, and Clann-Foghartaigh; and Uí-Cendfada and Clann-Colla, of the 
Feara-Manach), and head of counsel of the North of Erinn, was slain by O'hEighnigh and Muinter-
Caemhain; and they carried off his head, which was obtained from them at the end of a month 
afterwards. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cenél Conaill 
Conall Gulban was the son of Niall who established his kingdom, among other places, in Mag Ithe in 
the valley of the Finn. His territory was co-extensive, more or less with the present baronies of 
Tir Hugh, Bannagh, Boylagh and Kilmacrenan. Conall's sons included Óengus Gunnat, Nath Í, 
Tigernach Duí, Énna Bóguine, Fergus Cennfota (or Taulán), and Eochu. Some of the clans or 
territories of the Cenél Conaill included those of Sil Lugdach (O'Donnell, O'Boyle, 
O'Doherty, ...) Cenel Bóguine, Tir Ainmireach & Tir Aedha (O'Cannon, O'Muldorey, 
O'Gallaghers, ...), and Cenel Duach, among others. 

An early Cenél Conaill (O'Muldorey) genealogy:   (Rawlinson) 
Máel Ruanaid m. Muirchertaich m. Óengusa m. Máel Bresail m. Máel Doraid m. Óengusa m. h-Irchada m. 
Máel Bresail m. Flaithbertaich m. Loingsich m. Óengusa m. Domnaill m. Áeda m. Ainmerech m. Sétnai 
m. Fergusa Ceannfhoda m. Conaill Gulban m. Néill Noígiallaig. 

The annals cite for Cenél Conaill: 
For 464, Conall Gulban, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages (from whom are descended the Cinel 
Conaill), was slain by the old tribes of Magh Slecht, he having been found unprotected, and was 
buried at Fidhnach Maighe Rein, by Saint Caillin, as the Life of the aforesaid saint relates. 
For 564, The first year of Ainmire, son of Sedna, son of Fearghus Ceannfhoda, in the sovereignty 
of Ireland. 
For 566, After Ainmire, son of Sedna, son of Fearghus Ceannfhoda, was three years in the 
sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain by Fearghus, son of Nellin. 
For 567, After Baedan, son of Ninnidh, son of Fearghus Ceannfhoda, had been one year in the 
sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain at Leim An Eich. 
For 568, The first year of Aedh, son of Ainmire, over Ireland. Fearghus, son of Nellin, was slain 
by Aedh, son of Ainmire, in revenge of his father. Aedh was ancestor of the families 
O'Gallachubair (O'Gallagher), O'Canannan (O'Cannon) and O'Maeldoraidh (O'Muldory of Loch Erne) 
For 579, The battle of Druim Mic Earca, was gained by Aedh, son of Ainmire, over the Cinel Eogain, 
where was slain Colga, son of Domhnall, son of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach. 
For 586, Baedan, son of Níndedha, son? of Conall Gulban, king of Tara. 
For 594, After Aedh, son of Ainmire, son of Sedna, had been twenty seven years in the sovereignty 
of Ireland, he was slain by Bran Dubh, son of Eochaidh, in the battle of Dun Bolg, in Leinster, 
after Aedh had gone to exact the Borumha, and to avenge his son Comusgach upon them. Some nobles 
fell in this battle of Bealach Duin Bolg, together with Beg, son of Cuanach, Lord of Oirghialla. 
For 605, Seachnasach, son of Garbhan, chief of Cinel Boghaine, was slain by Domhnall, son of Aedh, 
son of Ainmire. 
For 608, The first year of Maelcobha, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire, in the sovereignty of Ireland. 
For 610, After Maelcobha, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire, had been three years in the sovereignty of 
Ireland, he was slain by Suibhne Meann, in the battle of Sliabh Toadh. 
For 624, The first year of Domhnall, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire, in the sovereignty of Ireland. 
For 634, The battle of Magh Rath was gained by Domhnall, son of Aedh, and the sons of Aedh Slaine, 
over Congal Claen, son of Scannlan, King of Ulidia, where fell Congal, and the Ulidians and 
foreigners along with him. 
For 639, After Domhnall, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire, had been sixteen years in the sovereignty of 
Ireland, he died at Ard Fothadh, in Tir Aedha, after the victory of penance, for he was a year in 
his mortal sickness; and he used to receive the body of Christ every Sunday. 
For 640, The first year of Conall Cael and Ceallach, two sons of Maelcobha, son of Aedh, son of 
Ainmire, over Ireland, in joint sovereignty. 
For 641, Maelbreasail and Maelanfaidh died; and Flann Enaigh was mortally wounded. These were of 
the Cinel Conaill Gulban. 
For 646, The battle of Dun Crimhthainn was gained by Conall and Ceallach, the two sons of 
Maelcobha, over Aenghus, son of Domhnall; and Aenghus was slain in this battle; and there was also 
slain in this same battle Cathasach, son of Domhnall Breac. 
For 656, After Conall and Ceallach, the two sons of Maelcobha, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire, had 
been seventeen years over Ireland, Conall was slain by Diarmaid, son of Aedh Slaine; and Ceallach 
died at Brugh Mic An Og. 
For 622, Conall and Colgu, two sons of Domhnall, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire, were slain by 
Ceirrceann. 
For 670, Dungal, son of Maeltuile, chief of Cinel Boghaine, was slain by Loingseach, son of 
Aenghus, chief of Cinel Conaill. 
For 694, The first year of Loingseach, son of Aenghus, in the sovereignty of Ireland. 
For 701, After Loingseach, son of Aenghus, son of Domhnall, had been eight years in the 
sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain in the battle of Corann, by Ceallach of Loch Cime, the son of 
Raghallach. There were slain also his three sons along with him, Artghal, Connachtach, and Flann 
Gearg. 
For 721, The battle of Druim Fornocht was fought by Flaithbheartach, son of Loingseach, and the 
Cinel Conaill, against Aedh Allan, son of Fearghal, and the Cinel Eoghain. Aedh Allan was 
defeated. These chieftains were slain on the side of Aedh, namely Flann, son of Erthaile, and 
Snedgus Dearg Ua Brachaidhe. 
For 723, The first year of Flaithbheartach, son of Loingseach, son of Aenghus, in sovereignty over 
Ireland. 
For 727, A battle was fought between Aedh, son of Fearghal, and the Cinel Conaill, at Magh Itha, 
where Conaing, son of Congal, son of Fearghus, and many others of the Cinel Eoghain, were slain. 
For 728, Flaithbheartach sent for a marine fleet of Dal Riada to Ireland, and on their arrival 
they made no delay till they arrived in Inis hOinae; and there was a battle fought between 
Flaithbheartach with his guards and the Cianachta, and others of the Ulidians and the Cinel 
Eoghain; and a countless number of the Ulidians, Cinel Eoghain, and Cianachta, were cut off, 
together with Conchubhar, son of Loichene, and Branchu, son of Bran; and a countless number of 
them was drowned in the Banna, after their having been defeated. 
For 749, Loingseach, son of Flaithbheartach, lord of Cinel Conaill, died. 
For 762, Murchadh, son of Flaithbheartach, lord of Cinel Conaill, was slain. 
For 782, A battle (i.e. the battle of Ircoir) between the Cinel Conaill and Cinel Eoghain, in 
which Domhnall, son of Aedh Muindearg, was routed. 
For 799, Domhnall, son of Aedh Muindearg, son of Flaithbheartach, son of Loingseach, son of 
Aenghus, son of Domhnall, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire, lord of the North, died. 
For 810, Colman, son of Niall, was slain by the Cinel Conaill. A hosting was made by Aedh 
Oirdnidhe against the Cinel Conaill, by which Roghallach, son of Flaithghius, was slain. 
For 817, A battle between the Cinel Conaill and Cinel Eoghain, in which Maelbreasail, son of 
Murchadh, lord of Cinel Conaill, was slain by Murchadh, son of Maelduin. 
For 868, Dalach, son of Muircheartach, lord of Cinel Conaill, was slain. 
For 874, The battle of Claideach, between the Cinel Eoghain and Cinel Conaill, in which Domhnall 
was routed. 
For 879, A hosting was made by the king, Flann, son of Maelseachlainn, with the Irishand 
foreigners, into the North; and they halted at Magh Eitir Di Glais, so that Ard Macha was 
plundered by some of the troops; and he took the hostages of the Cinel Conaill and Cinel Eoghain 
on that expedition. 
For 896, Maelbreasail, son of Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel Conaill, was slain in the battle of 
Sailtin, by Murchadh, son of Maelduin, lord of Cinel Eoghain. 
For 899, Fogartach, son of Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel Conaill, fell upon his own javelin, and died 
of it the wound. 
For 901, Eigneachan, son of Dalach, son of Muircheartach, lord of Cinel Conaill, died. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

For further Cenél Conaill reference, also see northern Uí Neill kings 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cenél Aedha, of Cenél Conaill, a sept descended from Conall Gulban who are said to have given 
their name to the barony of Tirhugh, alias Tír Aedha, in county Donegal. In Irish tradition, the 
naming of Tír Aedha is also cited from Aodh Ruadh, aka Tír n-Aeda Ruaid mic Badhuirnn (mic 
Airgedmair), a legendary monarch of Ireland and father of Macha, founder of Emain. From the same 
name comes Eas Ruaidh (Assaroe, now Ballyshannon), an early name for this region of Donegal. 

Early prominent septs in the area of Tirhugh included Ó Maeldoraidh, Ó Canannáin (O'Cannon) and Ó 
Gallchobhair (O'Gallagher). The former two were in early contention for the kingship of Cenél 
Conaill, as noted in the Annals. By the 13th century the O'Donnells rose to dominance among the 
septs of Cenél Conaill, the O'Gallaghers becoming the leaders of the O'Donnell calvary. 

An early Muinntiri Gallcubhair (O'Gallagher) genealogy:   (O'Clery) 
Gallchobar m. Ruarcain m. Ruaidri m. Donnchadha m. Domhnaill m. Ceallaigh m. Maoil cobha m. Aedha 
m. Ainmirech m. Setna m. Ferghusa cennfhoda m Conaill gulban m. Neill noighiallaigh. 

The annals cite: 
M896, Maelbreasail, son of Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel Conaill, was slain in the battle of Sailtin, 
by Murchadh, son of Maelduin, lord of Cinel Eoghain. 
.M899, Fogartach, son of Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel Conaill, fell upon his own javelin, and died 
of it the wound; of whom was said: The great deeded chieftain of Eas Ruaidh, ... 
CS943/M941, A battle-rout was inflicted by Ua Canannáin, by Ruaidrí, on the Cenél nEógain with the 
foreigners of Loch Febail, in which many fell including Mael Ruanaid son of Flann, heir designate 
of the North. 
U947, Ruaidrí ua Canannáin led an army to Sláine, and the foreigners and Irish, i.e. Congalach son 
of Mael Mithig and Amlaíb Cuaráin, came upon him, and the foreigners of Áth Cliath were defeated, 
and many of them killed and drowned. 
U949, Ua Canannáin made a foray and plundered Fir Lí and killed Flaithbertach ua Néill. 
M949, Niall Mothlach Ua Canannain was slain by the Cairbri-Mora. 
AI950, Death of Ruaidrí Ua Canannáin, high-king of Cenél Conaill. 
U950, Ruaidrí ua Canannáin, i.e. heir designate of Ireland, was killed by the foreigners after he 
had beleaguered Mide and Brega for six months and had inflicted a slaughter on the foreigners, to 
the number of two thousand or more. Niall ua Canannáin and a few others were also slain in a 
counterattack. 
CS957/U957/M955, Mael Coluim ua Canannáin, king of Cenél Conaill, dies. 
M960, Aenghus Ua Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel-Conaill, was slain by the Cinel-Conaill themselves. 
M962, Muircheartach Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, was killed by his own tribe. 
U967/M965, Mael Ísu ua Canannáin, king of Cenél Conaill, fell... by the Cenél Eógain. 
U977/M975, Gilla Coluim ua Canannáin was killed by Domnall ua Néill. 
M978, Tighearnan Ua Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel-Conaill, was slain. 
CS979/U978, A battle-rout was inflicted by the Airgialla on the Cenél Conaill in which many fell, 
including Niall ua Canannáin and ua Congalaigh and the son of Murchadh Glún Ilair and others. 
M989, Aedh Ua Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel-Conaill, died. 
CS997/M996, Ruaidrí son of Niall ua Canannáin, king of Cenél Conaill, dies. 
T1000/AI1003, Flaithbertach Ua Canannáin, king of Cenél Eógain and Cenél Conaill, was killed by 
his own people by treachery. 
Maelruanaidh ua Maeldoraidh, king of Cenél Conaill, went overseas on pilgrimage. 
M1010, An army was led by Brian to Magh-Corrann, and he took with him the lord of Cinel-Conaill, 
i.e. Maelruanaidh Ua Maeldoraidh, in obedience, to Ceann-Coradh. 
M1026, Maelruanaidh O'Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel-Conaill, went over the sea on his pilgrimage. He 
died the next year. 
CS1029, Muirchertach ua Maíldoraidh, king of Cenél Conaill, was killed by the Uí Canannáin at Ráth 
Canannáin. 
CS1030, Ruaidrí ua Canannáin was killed at Modorn by Aed ua Néill. 
M1032/LC1032, Domhnall, son of Maelruanaidh Ua Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel-Conaill, was slain by 
the Clann-Fianghusa. 
M1037, Three of the Ui-Maeldoraidh were slain by Ua Canannain. 
AI1045, Flaithbertach Ua Canannáin, king of Cenél Conaill, dies. 
M1059, Niall Ua Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel-Conaill, died after a good life,... 
M1061, Domhnall Ua Maeldoraidh was slain by Ruaidhri Ua Canannain in a battle. 
CS1071, Ruaidrí ua Canannáin, king of Cenél Conaill,was killed. 
LC1072, Ruaidhri O'Canannain, king of Cenel-Conaill, was slain by Ua Maeldoraidh, i.e. Aenghus. 
LC1075/CS1075, Donnchadh Ua Canannáin, king of Cenél Conaill, dies. 
U1083, Domnall ua Canannáin, king of Cenél Conaill, was killed by his own people. 
LC1085, Murchadh Ua Maeldoraidh, king of Cenel-Conaill, pillar of dignity, nobility, and 
hospitality, died 
LC1093, Aedh Ua Canannain, king of Cenel-Conaill, was blinded by Domhnall Mac Lachlainn, king of 
Oilech. 
LC1103, Ua Canannain, i.e. the King of Cenel-Conaill, was expelled from his sovereignty by 
Domhnall Mac Lachlainn. 
LC1114, Ruaidhri Ua Canannain, royal heir of Cenel-Conaill, was slain by the Cenel-Eoghain. 
MCB1126, A great foray by Ruaidhrí Ó Canannáin, king of Cinéal Conaill, into Connacht after 
Toirdhealbhach. 
CS1135, Ruaidrí ua Canannáin, king of Cenél Conaill, was killed by the Cenél Eogain. 
M1153, Flaithbheartach Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, and his wife, Dubhchobhlaigh, daughter 
of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, were drowned, with the crew of a ship of their people along with 
them, in the sea, opposite Cairbre of Druim-cliabh. 
M1154, Aedh, son of Ruaidhri Ua Canannain, assumed the lordship of Tir-Conaill. 
M1156, Aedh, son of Ruaidhri Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, was slain by Ua Cathain and 
Feara-na-Craeibhe, by treachery. 
M1160, Two of the Ui-Maeldoraidh were killed by the Aithchleireach Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-
Conaill, while under the protection of the laity and clergy of the Cinel-Conaill themselves.The 
Aithchleireach himself and two others of the Ui-Canannain were killed by the Cinel-Conaill, in 
revenge of their guarantee. 
M1165, Maghnus Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, died. 
LC1181, Flaithbbertach O'Maeldoraidh, king of Cenel-Conaill gained a battle upon the sons of the 
kings of Connacht... 
LC1188, Ruaidhri O'Canannáin, king of Cenel-Conaill for a time, and also royal heir of Erinn, was 
slain by Flaithbhertach O'Maeldoraidh, through treachery... 
LC1196, Flaithbhertach O'Maeldoraidh, king of Cenel-Conaill, and Cenel-Eoghain, and Airghiall, the 
defender of Temhair, and royal heir of all Erinn, died. 
1248, Muiris Fitz Gerald marched into Tir Conaill. He raided and slew and plundered, and he 
banished O Canannain, who took refuge with the Cenel Eogain, and left the kingship of Cenel 
Conaill with Gofraid son of Domnall Mor O Domnaill. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Sil Lugdach, of the Cenél Conaill and Clann Dálaigh. Lugaid was the son of Setna, and great-
grandson of Conall Gulban, whose descendants included the sept of O'Domhnaill (O'Donnell), Kings 
of Tir Conaill from the 13th to the 17th centuries ("Flight of the Earls"). Sil Lugdach, or Cenél 
Luighdech, is described as a chief sept seated in the barony of Kilmacrenan, county Donegal (Book 
of Fenagh), their tribal territory extended from Dobhar (Gweedore) to the river Suilidhe (Swilly) 
(Leabhar na gCeart). The O'Donnells, at first lived along the river Lennon but later established 
themselves in south Donegal. They rose to power as kings of Cenél Conaill in the early 13th 
century. 
The Uí Baoighill (O'Boyles) and the Uí Dochartaig (O'Dohertys) were also of Sil Lugdach. 

An early Sil Lugdach genealogy"   (Rawlinson) 
Cathbarr m. Gillai Críst m. Cathbairr m. Domnaill m. Éicnich m. Dálaich m. Muirchertaich m. Cind 
Fáelad m. Airnelaich m. Máel Dúin m. Cind Fáelad m. Gairb m. Rónáin m. Lugdach m. Sétnai mic 
Fergus m. Conaill Gulban m. Néill Noígiallaig. 

The annals cite: 
For 868, Maelmordha, son of Ailell, lord of Cinel Lughdhach, died. 
U1011, Mael Ruanaid ua Domnaill, king of Cenél Lugdach, was killed by the Fir Maige Itha, [and] 
Aengus ua Lapáin i.e. king of Cenél Énna, by the Cenél Eógain of Inis [Eógain]. 
LC1038, Gillachrist, son of Cathbharr Ua Domhnaill, the prop of battle and defence of the Cenel-
Conaill, was slain by the son of Conn Ua Domhnaill. 
U1100, The grandson of Gilla Coluim ua Domnaill, king of Cenél Lugdach, was killed by his own 
people. 
M1106, Cathbharr O'Domhnaill, pillar of the defence and warfare, of the glory and hospitality, of 
the Cinel-Luigdheach, died, after having gained the victory over the world and the devil. 
M1129, The house of Colum-Cille at Cill-mic-Nenain was forcibly taken, by Ua Tairchert, from Aedh, 
son of Cathbharr Ua Domhnaill, and it was burned over him. 
LC1207, A depredation was commited by Eignechán O'Domhnaill in Feara-Manach; but the Feara-Manach, 
in greater force than they were, overtook them, and O'Domhnaill, king of Tír-Conaill, till then 
the tower of valour, and honour, and strength of the North of Erinn, was slain there. 
LC1208, A great predatory hosting by Aedh O'Neill into Inis-Eoghain, and O'Domhnaill, i.e. 
Domhnall Mór, overtook them, when a battle was fought between them, in which a countless multitude 
of people were slain on either side... 
MCB1209, A battle between Cinéal Eóghain and Cinéal Conaill near Fathan Mura, in which Cathbharr Ó 
Domhnaill, king of Cinéal Conaill, together with many of the Cinéal Conaill, was killed. 
C1231, Domnall O Domnaill king of Tir Conaill and Aengus Mac Gilla Finnein raised an army against 
Cathal O Raigillig. 
U1241, Domnall Mor Ua Domnaill, king of Tir-Conaill and Fir-Manach and Cairpri and Airghialla from 
the Plain downwards, died on the pillow, after bringing victory from the world and from the demon 
and he was buried in the Monastery of Es-ruadh. 
C1241, Maelsechlainn the son of O Domnaill was made king in succession to his father. O Neill 
(Brian, banished by Mac Lochlainn) came to him and together they marched back into Cenel Eogain, 
where Domnall Mac Lochlainn gave them battle - the battle of Camergi. Here Domnall Mac Lochlainn, 
king of Cenel nEogain, was slain, with ten of his close kindred. All the chieftains of Cenel 
nEogain were slain here and the kingship seized by Brian O Neill. 
C1246, Muiris Mac Gerailt made a great raid into Tir Conaill and gave half of it to Cormac son of 
Diarmait son of Ruaidri [O Conchobair]. He took hostages of O Domnaill for the other half and left 
them in the castle of Sligo. O Domnaill came on the first day of November with the chief men of 
Tir Conaill to Sligo and they burned the bawn of the town but could not prevail against the 
castle. The garrison hanged their hostages on the roof before their eyes. 
C1248, Muiris Fitz Gerald marched into Tir Conaill. He raided and slew and plundered, and he 
banished O Canannain, who took refuge with the Cenel Eogain, and left the kingship of Cenel 
Conaill with Gofraid son of Domnall Mor O Domnaill. 
C1248, The Cenel Eogain and O Canannain marched into Tir Conaill again. The Cenel Conaill gave 
battle to them and O Canannain with many noble persons besides was slain by the Cenel Conaill and 
Gofraid son of Domnall Mor O Domnaill, who took the kingship of Tir Conaill. 
C1258, Gofraid O Domnaill, king of Tir Conaill, died. Domnall O Domnaill was made king in his 
stead, and all the Cenel Conaill gave hostages and allegiance to him. 
C1290, Aed O Domnaill was deposed by his own brother Toirrdelbach, who assumed the kingship 
himself through the power of his mother's kin, the Clann Domnaill, and of many other 
Gallowglasses. 
C1333, Aed O Domnaill, king of Tir Conaill and Fermanagh, who had taken the hostages of both 
districts of Carbury and of Brefne and would have made a good king of the whole province of 
Ulster, the support of all Ireland by his bounty, bravery, discipline and rule, the greatest 
slayer of Galls and Gaels who were his contemporaries, died after a victory over the world and the 
Devil, having been king of Tir Conaill for fifty-two years. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Arda Midhair, The Ó Dochartaigh (O'Dohertys), of Cenél Conaill, were cited as chiefs of Arda 
Midhair (Ardmire, perhaps the Finn Valley) in the barony of Raphoe, county Donegal. At the turn of 
the 13th century two Ó Dochartaigh were noted as kings of Tír Chonaill, breaking a long hold the 
O'Cannons and O'Muldorys (Mulderrys) had on this title. Soon after the O'Donnells rose to 
prominence in Tír Chonaill. By 1247 the O'Donnells are noted as Lords of Inishowen for the first 
time (Annals), an apparent indication of Cenel Conaill expansion into a region traditionally held 
region by the Cenel Eoghain (Mac Lochlainn). The arrival of the Norman de Burgo family by the 
latter half of the 13th century saw the building of fortifications in the region. Any fear of 
further Anglo-Norman expansion in Inishowen and Derry, however, was halted by the murder of Earl 
William de Burgh in 1333, and the absenteeism of his heirs kept the path open for Gaelic dominance 
in the region. It was perhaps during this time the Ó Dochartaigh began to make inroads into 
Inishowen, as chieftains under O'Donnell. By the early 15th century the Ó Dochartaighs are noted 
as lords of Inishowen (Annals), and the peninsula later became known as "O'Dogherty's Country". 

An early Ua Dochartaigh genealogy:   (O'Clery) 
Diarmada m Conchobhair m Domhnaill finn m Donnchadha duinn m Domhnaill droma fornochta m 
Maenghuile m Donnchadha m Moenghuile m Dochartaigh (o raiter .h. Dochartaigh) m Maenghuile m 
Fiamhain m Cinnfaeladh m Gairbh m Ronain m Luigdheach m Setna m Ferghusa cennfhoda m Conaill 
gulban. 

The annals cite: 
LC1188, Ruaidhri O'Canannáin, king of Cenel-Conaill for a time, and also royal heir of Erinn, was 
slain by Flaithbhertach O'Maeldoraidh, through treachery, at the bridge of Sligech, i.e. after 
being enticed out from the middle of Druim-cliabh; and a brother of his was slain along with him, 
and a number of his people. O'Gairbh (namely, Maghnus), chieftain of Feara-Droma, it was that laid 
(violent) hands on O'Canannáin; and he was himself slain by the people of Echmarcach 
O'Dochartaigh, in revenge of O'Canannáin. 
LC1195, The Gilla-sron-mhael O'Dochartaigh, and the Cenel-Conaill likewise, turned against 
O'Maeldoraidh. 
LC1196, Echmarcach O'Dochartaigh assumed the sovereignty of Cenel-Conaill... 
MCB1197, A battle between John de Courcy and Cinéal Conaill at Cnoc na Sgam, in which slaughter 
was inflicted on them, and Eachmharcach Ó Dochartaigh, their king, was killed. 
LC1199, Domhnall O'Dochartaigh, king of Cenel-Enna and Ard-Midhair, in pace quievit. 
LC1202, Domhnall Carrach O'Dochartaigh, king-chieftain of Ard-Midhair, was slain by Muinter-
Buighill, after plundering many churches and territories. 
U1203, Domnall Carrach Ua Dochartaigh, king of Tir-Conaill was killed by Muinnter-Baighill after 
pillaging many churches and territories. 
U1252, Conchobur Ua Dochartaigh, chief of Ard-midhair for a time, died. 
U1288, Aindiles O'Dochartaigh, chief of Ard-Midhair, rested in Christ. 
U1339, Domnall Ua Dochartaigh, arch-chief of Ard-Midhair -and it is not this alone, for there was 
little wanting from his having the lordship of Inis-Eogain and the lordship of the Cantred of Tir-
hEnna and there was scarcely in Ireland a chief that had more people and a larger horse-host and 
better spirit and valour, hospitality and bestowal than he - and he died in the centre of his own 
house and John Ua Dochartaigh took his place. 
U1356/LC1359, John O'Dochartaigh, chieftain of Ard-Midhair, was taken prisoner. 
LC1413, Conchobhar O'Dochartaigh, i.e. chieftain of Ard-Midhair, and lord of Inis-Eoghain, and a 
man of universal bounty, died this year. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cenél mBógaine, of the Cenél Conaill, named from Énna Bóguine, son of Conall Gulban. O'Donovan 
describes Tír Boghaine as the barony of Banagh, and part of the barony of Boylagh, in county 
Donegal. 
St. Crona (Croine Bheag) who was living in the 7th century was the daughter of Diarmuid, son of 
Garbhan, son of Brandubh, son of Melge, son of Enna Boghuine, son of Conall Gulban, Son of Niall 
Naoighiallaigh (Niall of the Nine Hostages). 

An early Cenel Bóguine genealogy:   (Rawlinson) 
Murchad m. Máel Ograi m. Echdach m. Forbassaich m. Sechnassaich m. Dúngalaich m. Máel Tuili m. 
Sechnassaich m. Garbáin m. Branduib m. Meilge m. Énnae Bóguine m. Conaill Gulban m. Néill 
Noígiallaig. 

The annals cite: 
M605/T609, Seachnasach, son of Garbhan, chief of Cinel Boghaine, was slain by Domhnall, son of 
Aedh, son of Ainmire. 
T626, Fiacha Fínd, rí Cenéoil Boghuine, died. 
M670, Dungal, son of Maeltuile, chief of Cinel Boghaine, was slain by Loingseach, son of Aenghus, 
chief of Cinel Conaill. 
CS722/M718, Forbasach king of Cenél Bógaine, e of Cenél Conaill, fell in battle. 
M781, Forbhasach, son of Seachnasach, chief of Cinel Boghaine, died. 
U784, A battle won by Donnchad son of Aed Muinderg over the Cenél Bogaine. 
U786, Death of Forbasach son of Sechnusach, king of Cenél Bógaine. 
U847/M845, Mael Goán son of Echaid, king of Cenél Bógaine, died. 
U1035, Flaithbertach ua Murchada, king of Cenél Bógaine, was killed with many others. 
U1496, Mac Suibne of Tir-Bagaine, namely, Mael-Muire, died this year. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cenel Duach, of the Cenél Conaill, named from Tigernach Duí (Duach), son of Conall Gulban. Nainnid 
son of Daui is mentioned in Chronicon Scotorum 563 at the battle of Móin Daire Lothair which was 
won over the Cruithin by the Uí Néill of the North. Chronicon Scotorum, in the year 586, notes the 
killing of Baetán son of Ninnid son of Daui son of Conall Gulban, king of Temair. The Annals of 
Tigernach cite Baedan, son of Níndedha, grandson of Conall Gulban, as a king of Tara in AD 586, 
i.e. Baedan mac Níndedha, maic Conaill Gulban, rí Temrach. In the Annals of Ulster, for 586, his 
obituary appears as "the killing of Baetán son of Ninnid son of Daui alias son of Fergus Cennfhata 
son of Conall of Gulbu, king of Temair, who reigned one year." 

A Cenel Duach genealogy:   (Rawlinson) 
Nuadu m. Duinechda m. Cuircc m. Duach m. Sechnassaich m. Conaill m. Báetáin m. Ninnida m. Duach m. 
Conaill Gulban m. Néill Noígiallaig. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Tir Ainmireach, a name applied to an area of Ua Bhaeighill (O'Boyle) chieftainship in southern 
county Donegal. O'Hart (Pedigrees) calls the O'Boyles chiefs of Clan Chindfaoladh of Tir 
Ainmireach, and of Tir Boghaine. Originally their territory extended from Donegal town to near 
Kilmacreannan along the west coast. The O'Boyles are said to have given their name to the barony 
of Boylagh in county Donegal. With the rise of the O'Donnells in the 13th century, their territory 
became divided, with Tir Ainmireach (around Ardara) in the south, and the Three Tuatha (around 
Falcarragh and Kilmacrennan) toward the north. The MacSweeneys were brought into this area as 
Gallowglass to O'Donnell in the 14th century. 

An early Ua Bhaeighill genealogy:   (O'Clery) 
Toirrdelbach ruadh m Taidh oicc m Taidhg m Toirrdelbaigh m Neill m Toirrdelbaigh oicc m 
Toirrdelbaigh moir m Nell ruaidh m Menman m Aedha m Aindilis m Menman m Conchobair m Cellaigh m 
Giolla brighde m Aindilis m Garbann m Baighill m Bradagain m Muirchertaigh m Cindfhaeladh 

The annals cite: 
LC1131, Garbhanach Ua Baeighill, was slain. 
U1160, Ua Canannain, king of Cenel-Conaill, was killed by the Cenel-Conaill themselves, namely, a 
house was burned by Ua Baighill upon him. 
LC1192, Eochaidh O'Baeighill was slain by the Uí-Fiachrach of Ard-sratha. 
U1203, Domnall Carrach Ua Dochartaigh, king of Tir-Conaill was killed by Muinnter-Baighill after 
pillaging many churches and territories. 
U1223, Tadhg O'Baighill (namely, son of Ceallach), splendour of the North of Ireland, died. 
U1232, A hosting by Domnall Ua Lochlainn, [namely] by the king of Cenel-Eogain, along with the 
Foreigners and with the Gaidhil, into Tir-Conaill, whereby he destroyed much in Fanat and in Tir-
Conaill and took away the hostages of Domnall Ua Baighill and of Ua Taircheirt with him. 
U1251, Gilla-Crist Ua Breslen, chief of Fanat and his kinsman were killed by Ceallach Ua Baighill 
the Dumb. 
U1259, Sigraidh O'Baighill was killed by his own kinsmen. 
U1278, Maelruanaigh O'Baighill, chief of 'the Three Territories', was killed. 
U1281, Dubghall, son of Maghnus Ua Baighill chief of Cloch-Cinnfhaelaidh, was killed by the people 
of Ua Mailgaithi. 
U1340, Aindiles O'Baighill, chief of Tir-hAinmirech and his son and Eogan, were killed in battle. 
M1360, Mulrony, son of the Cammhuinelach (the Wry-necked) O'Boyle, Chief of the three Tuathas, a 
man illustrious for his hospitality, nobleness, wisdom, conquests, and protection, died. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Rosguill, a promontory (or Ross) in the barony of Kilmacrenan, co. Donegal, between Sheep Haven 
and Mulroy bay, i.e. in the parish of Mevagh. O'Dugan (Poems) cites that Ros-Guill and Ros-Iorguil 
belong to MacGillatsamhais. Ros-Iorguil, or Irguill, is equated to Horn Head, to the west of Ros 
Guill, in the index to the Four Masters. Both areas are west of Fanad. Who the MacGillatsamhais' 
(Mac Giolla Shamhais) were is not known. 

In the same section of his Topographical Poem, O'Dugan also mentions belong to O'Cearnachain (e.g. 
Kernaghan) and Muintir Dalachain over Tuath Bladhach (Bladhaigh). Tuath Bladhaigh, anglicized 
Tuath Doe, is a well known district situated between Sheep Head and Cloghaneely, placing it to the 
south of Ros-Iorguil. Cloghineely is noted by O'Donovan in connection with the Ua Baighill 
(O'Boyles) of Cloch Cinnfhaelaidh, where they held sway until perhaps the second half of the 14th 
century. Here they are cited as chiefs of na Trí Tuath before the MacSweeneys. The areas of 
Rosguill (now Downing's & Carrigart), Doe (now Creeslough & Dunfanaghy), Cloughaneely (now 
Falcarragh ) and Tory Island, were later ruled by the Mac Sweeneys from Doe Castle. These were the 
MacSweeney Na Doe (Mac Suibhne na d'Tuath), lords of Na Tuatha. The district called Na Trí Tuatha, 
or Tuatha Toraighe, was an area extending from Ros Guill and Mulroy Bay in the east to Gweedore 
Bay in the west, with Tory Island included. 
Note: Trí Tuatha, not to be confused with the Three Tuatha of county Roscommon. 

The annals cite: 
M718, Nuada, son of Eirc, chief of Gull and Irgull. 
CS722, Nuadu son of Orc (Orcdoith), king of Goll and Irgoll. 
M1130, Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair proceeded with a fleet as far as Torach, and plundered Ros-
Guill. 
M1247, A great army was led by Maurice Fitzgerald, and the other English chiefs, first to Sligo, 
and thence to the Cataract of Aedh Roe, the son of Badharn. Melaghlin O'Donnell was slain on the 
spot, as well as the Cammhuinealach (Wry-necked) O'Boyle, the head Chieftain of the Three 
Tuathas, ... 
C1281, Maelruanaid O Baigill, chieftain of the Three Tuatha. 
M1303, Niall, son of Niall O'Boyle, heir presumptive to the Three Tuathas, was slain. 
M1360, Mulrony, son of the Cammhuinelach (the Wry-necked) O'Boyle, Chief of the three Tuathas, a 
man illustrious for his hospitality, nobleness, wisdom, conquests, and protection, died. 
LC1515/U1515, Domhnall, son of Aedh Ruadh O'Domhnaill, was slain by Aedh Buidhe O'Domhnaill, in 
Tuath-Bladhaidh, in this year, and was carried dangerously wounded to the house of Mac Suibne of 
Fanat and died there, after Unction and after penance. 
U1540, Jacques, son of Conn Ua Domnaill, was slain by the sons of Murchadh Mac Suibne na Tuath 
this year. 
M1591, O'Rourke, i.e. Brian-na-Murtha, the son of Brian, son of Owen, was banished, as stated 
before, into the Tuatha in Tirconnell, where he remained upwards of a year with Mac Sweeny (Owen 
Oge). 
M1603, Hugh Boy, the son of Con, was wounded in the ankle; and he was sent to Crannog-na-nDuini in 
Ros-Guill, in the Tuathas, to be healed. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Finn Ros, aka The Rosses, in Tirconnell, the land of the O Forananes and O Carnahanes, according 
to O'Brien's Irish Dictionary. O'Dugan (Poems) places O'Furadhrain over Fionn Ros, and O'Donovan 
translates the surname as Farran or Forran. O'Donovan in his notes to O'Dugan's Poems cites Fionn-
Ros, now the Rosses, was situated in the barony of Boylagh. The Rosses are marked on a modern map 
of Ireland in the civil parish of Templecrone, in the far north of the barony of Boylagh. The 
Rosses extends from Crolly Bridge in the north to Gweebarra Bridge in the south, embracing all the 
intervening coastline and islands, penetrating inland as far as the Derryveagh mountains and the 
alpinesque village of Doochary. 

The territory of Trián Íochtair Baoighellach is described by O'Donovan (Four Masters) in "The 
Rosses", between Aranmore Island and the Gweedore river, in county Donegal. At least a portion of 
the Rosses region, if not all, was connected with the O'Boyles, near of a portion of the Tri Tuath 
area they once held. 

The annals cite: 
LC1342, Conchobhar O'Domhnaill; king of Tir-Conaill, and one worthy to rule all Erinn, if God had 
willed it, by reason of his nobility, eminence, and the excellence of his bounty and prowess, was 
slain by Niall O'Domhnaill, i.e. his own father's son: (the house of Finn-ros was burned over him, 
and O'Domhnaill went out of the house, and fell afterwards in the doorway of his own house), after 
obtaining victory over the devil and the world; and a great number of O'Domhnaill's household band 
were moreover burned and killed there. Niall O'Domhnaill was made king by a number of the 
chieftains of Tir-Conaill. 
M1603, Hugh Boy, the son of Con, was wounded in the ankle; and he was sent to Crannog-na-nDuini in 
Ros-Guill, in the Tuathas, to be healed. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Fánad, or Fanat, is the peninsula between Lough Swilly and Mulroy Bay, in the northeast of the 
barony of Kilmacrenan, county Donegal. The sept of Ua Bresleáin (O'Breslen or Breslin), a branch 
of the Cenél Enda (MacLysaght) although cited by others as a branch of Cenel Conaill, are noted as 
early chiefs of Fanad, later noted as Brehons for Maguire of Fermanagh. The Mac Suibhnes (Mac 
Sweeney Fanat) are not as chiefs of Fanad in the late 14th century. 

The annals cite: 
U1158, A hosting by Ua Lachlainn into Tir-Conaill also, so that he wasted Fanat entirely. 
MCB1183, Defeat and, slaughter [inflicted] by John de Courcy at Cúil an Tuaiscirt on Cinéal 
Eóghain, [Cinéal] Conaill, and Cianachta, and Giolla Críost Ó Cathain, son of the king of Fir na 
Craoibhe, and Raghnall Ó Brisléin, chieftain of Fána, were killed. 
M1186, Con O'Breslen, Chief of Fanad, the lamp of the hospitality and valour of the north of 
Ireland, was slain by the son of Mac Loughlin and a party of the Kinel-Owen; in consequence of 
which Inishowen was unjustly ravaged. 
M1213, Donn O'Breslen, Chief of Fanad, was treacherously killed by his own people. 
U1232, A hosting by Domnall Ua Lochlainn, [namely] by the king of Cenel-Eogain, along with the 
Foreigners and with the Gaidhil, into Tir-Conaill, whereby he destroyed much in Fanat and in Tir-
Conaill and took away the hostages of Domnall Ua Baighill and of Ua Taircheirt with him. 
M1251, Gilchreest O'Breslen, Chief of Fanad, and his brother, were slain by Kellagh Balbh (the 
Stammering) O'Boyle. 
M1261, Sixteen of the most distinguished of the clergy of Kinel-Connell were killed at Derry by 
Conor O'Neill and the Kinel-Owen, together with Conor O'Firgil. Conor O'Neill was slain 
immediately afterwards by Donn O'Breslen, Chief of Fanad, through the miracles of God and St. 
Columbkille. 
M1263, Donn O'Breslen was slain by Donnell O'Donnell, in the bishop's court palace at Raphoe. 
M1281, Cormac, son of the Ferleighin Lector O'Donnell, Chief of Fanad, fell. 
LC1399, Toirdhelbhach, son of Maelmuire Mac Suibhne, lord of Fanad, quievit. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cenél Enda 
Two distinct territories are mentioned. From Eanna (Enda), the sixth son of Conall Gulban, 
descended the Cinel Eanna, Kings of Magh Ith, Tir Eanna and Fanad in present day Co. Donegal. This 
territory was in and near the southern tip of Inishowen. (note: The cantred of Enda, son of Niall, 
is mentioned by the Four Masters in the year 1600). 
Hogan (Goedelicum) describes the original apportionment to Enna, son of Niall, in the partition of 
Tirconnell, circa 400 A.D. to comprise from the boundary of Inis Eoghain to Bearnas mor (Gap of 
Barnesmore, near Donegal) and Sruthail (Sruell, Killyward parish, barony of Banagh, c. Don.) 
According to O'Dugan (Poems), the following were chiefs of Magh Ith: O'Baoighill, O'Maiolbreasail, 
O'Cuinn, and O'Cionaith. Mag Ith was partly in the barony of Raphoe in Donegal, and partly in the 
barony of Tirkeran in Derry. O'Breslin, cited as chiefs in Fanad and noted as brehons there, are 
cited by MacLysaght as a branch of Cenel Enda, and by others as a branch of Cenel Conaill (descent 
from Fergus Fanad). 

Another Cenél Endai was cited in southern Co. Donegal and possibly northwestern Co. Fermanagh. As 
the story goes, Enda, the youngest son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, received territory about the 
5th century which extended from the river Errity to Barnesmore, barony of Tir Hugh, to Sruell in 
the barony of Banagh, county of Donegal. The north-western limit was Farnagh in the parish of 
Aughnis, barony of Kilmacrenan. The eastern limit of his lands was the river Finn. 

To confuse matters, there does not appear to be evidence of a dynastic family descended from Énda 
existing in the North before the 11th century. All earlier references in the Irish texts seem to 
associate the Cenél Énda with the Cenél Fiachach and the Lóegaire in Mide and also in Connacht. 
For example, Ua Braonain (O'Brennan) of Creeve and Mac Ruairc (Mag Rourke, Groarke) of Teallach-
Conmasa, both located in county Westmeath, claim descent from a Cenél nÉnna. 

11th century chiefs of Cenél n-Enda mentioned in the annals below include ua Lapáin (O'Lappin) and 
ua h-Eicnechan (roughly O'Heneghan). Chiefs from Cenél Moen and Cenél Conaill are later noted in 
the area of Tir Enda in co. Donegal. 

The annals cite: 
M1010, Oenghus Ua Lapáin, tigherna Cenél n-Enda was slain by the Cinel-Eoghain of the Island. 
LC1019, Flaithbhertach Ua Neill went into Tir-Conaill, and he destroyed Tir-Enna and Tir-Lughdech. 
M1036, Cú Ciche, mac Eccnecháin, tigherna Ceneoil Enda, died. 
M1057, Niall Ua hEgnechain, king of Cenel-Enna, rested. 
LC1078, Cathal, son of Domhnall, king of Cenel-Enna, was killed by the Cenel-Eoghain of the 
Island. 
M1175, The Kinel-Enda were defeated, and a great slaughter made of them by Eachmarcach O'Kane, and 
Niall O'Gormly. 
M1177, Niall O'Gormly, Lord of the men of Magh-Ithe and Kinel-Enda, was slain by Donough 
O'Carellan and the Clandermot in the middle of Derry Columbkille. 
M1177, O'Muldory and the Kinel-Connell were defeated by Conor O'Carellan in a battle, in which 
O'Sherry and many other distinguished men of the Kinel-Enda were slain. 
M1199, Donnell O'Doherty, Lord of Kinel-Enda and Ard-Mire (Ard-Midhair), died. 
M1201, On the same day the Kinel-Owen made another predatory incursion into Tirconnell; and a 
conflict took place between them and O'Donnell, in which the Kinel-Owen were defeated, and 
Gearrmaidi O'Boylan and many others of the Kinel-Owen were slain alone with him. 
M1342, Donnell O'Doherty, Chief of Ardmire, and of the cantred of Tir-Enda, a man full of 
hospitality and prowess, died, and John O'Doherty assumed his place. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cenél Cairpri [Mor] 
"Críoch Cairpre Droma Cliab" of northern Co. Sligo and northeast Co. Leitrim. The territory of 
Cairbre, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, around the 6th century extended from the Drowes west 
to the Owenmore river in Ballysadare. Duncarbry (Dun Chairbre, or Cairbre's Fort) - later a 
McClancy fort - marks the border of Cairbre's territory on the Drowes, while the Barony of Carbury 
in North Sligo today reminds us also of where he ruled. Noted chiefs of Cenél Cairpre included 
O'Mulclohy (Ó Maolchloiche), a name which was later mistranslated to Stone. Cairbre's descendants 
are said to have also settled in Grandard in the county of Longford. 

Other Cairpre septs - Uí Cairpri Laigen (Ua Ciardha of Carbury, Co. Kildare); and Cairpre Gabra, 
near Grandard, co. Longford. 

An early Cairpri Mor genealogy:   (Rawlinson) 
h-Uallgarg m. Máel Ruanaid m. Máel Fábaill m. Ciardai m. Máel Bennachtai m. Écneicháin m. Dúnchada 
m. Arttgaile m. Donngaile m. Loingsich m. Lóegaire m. Con Gamna m. Moínaich m. Fiangusa m. 
Congaile m. Máel Dúin m. Scandláin m. Roitich m. Ainmerech m. Cormaicc m. Cairpri m. Néill 
Noígiallaig. 

The annals cite (possibly related to this Cairpri sept): 
Ua Ciardai as king of Cairpri around 954 (referring to the Cairpri Moir). 
For 993 Maol Ruanaidh ua Ciardha, lord of Cairpre, is slain by the men of Teftha; 
For 1012, Ualgharg ua Ciarrdhai lá tigherna Coirpre. 
For 1017, Aodh na Dearbha Ua Ciarrdha was tigherna (lord) of Cairpre; 
For 1024 Maol Ruanaidh ua Ciarrdhai is cited as tigherna Cairpre; 
For 1046, Ferghal Ua Ciardha, tigherna Cairpre; 
For 1080 Giolla Muire Ua Ciarrdha, tigherna Cairpre; 
For 1138 Domnall O Cíardha is cited as rí Cairpri; 

The annals cite for the general terms Cairpre, Coirpri, et al: 
For 485, The first battle of Granairet. Coirpre, son of Niall Naígiallach, was victor. 
For 491, The battle of Taillten was gained over the Lagenians by Coirpre, son of Niall. 
For 495, The second battle of Granairet. Eochu son of Coirpre son of Ailill son of Dúnlang son of 
Énna Niad was victor. 
For 544, Tuathal Maelgarbh, son of Cormac Caech, son of Coirpre, son of Niall, King of Temhair, 
died. 
For 598, Colman, chief of Cinel Cairbre was victor at the battle of Eachros in Muirisc, against 
Maelcothaigh, chief of Cinel Fiachrach, of Muirisc. 
For 649, Oengusa Bronbachlae, regis Ceniuil Coirpri, died. 
For 665 Maelduin, son of Scannal, chief of Cinel Coirbre died; (Sligo?) 
For 669, Dubhduin, chief of Cinel Cairbre slays Seachnasach, son of Blathmac, the king of Tara 
(Cairbre of co. Longford?) 
For 678, Conall Oirgneach, chief of Cinel Cairbre, was slain. 
For 681, Fearghus, son of Maelduin, chief of Cinel Cairbre. was slain at the battle of Corann 
(Sligo?). 
For 696, Muirghius, son of Maelduin, Lord of Cinel Cairbre, died. (Sligo?) 
For 706, Concobar mac Maili Duín rí Cenéoil Cairpri died. (Sligo?) 
For 707 and again for 722 Conall Mend is cited as rí Ceneoil Cairpri (Sligo?). 
For 744, Mac Cuanach the Wise one of the Cinel Cairbre, died. 
For 747 and 752, Flaithbheartach, son of Conall Meann, chief of Cinel Cairbre (Sligo?). 
For 752, Death of Conaing grandson of Dub Dúin, king of Cenél Cairpri of Tethba. (Cairbre of co. 
Longford) 
For 757 the Cinel Cairbre defeat the Luigne at the battle of Caille Taidbig. 
For 771, Cathal son of Conall Menn, king of Cairpre Mór, died (Sligo?). 
For 787, The battle of Ard Mic Rime was fought also by Muirgheas, son of Tomaltach, against the Ui 
nAilella, wherein were slain ... Cathmugh, son of Flaithbheartach, lord of Cairbre, ... (Sligo?). 
For 779, Cú Gamna, son of Naeinneanaigh, lord of Cinel Cairbre, died. 
For 787, Cathmugh, son of Flaithbheartach, lord of Cairbre was slain. 
For 813, Laegaire son of Cú Gamna, king of Cenél Cairpri, dies. 
For 871, Dunadhach, son of Raghallach, lord of Cinel Cairbre Mor, died. (Sligo?) 
For 954, Ua Ruairc inflicted a great slaughter on the Cairpre and Tethba, and ua Ciardai, king of 
Cairpri, fell. 
For 976 Ferghal mac Foghartaig is cited as ríg Cairpre Moíre. (Sligo?) 
For 1030, Donncadh, rí Cairpre, was slain by the Uib Fiachrach Muirsce. 
For 1032, Murchadh, mac Searraigh, tigerna Coirpre Móiri, died. 
For 1045 Glún Iaraind h-Ua Cleirchen, ri h-Ua Cairpri; 
For 1105, Maol Ruanaidh Ua Bilraighe, tigherna Ua Cairpre; 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Other Notes from O'Dugan, O'Hart, O'Donovan, etc. 
Síl Aedha Eaniagh - O'Murchada, O'Murphy, and O'Mellon (barony of Strabane, co. Tyrone) 
Cineal Eachaidh (Corca Eachaidh) - O'Kelly, Corcaghee?, in the barony of Dungannon 
Teallach Cathalain, Teallach Duibhbrailbe (in Inishowen), Tealach Braenain - O'Duvany (Devenny, 
Dubhanaigh, Duibheannaigh, or Ó Duibheamhna?), Oh-Aghmaill or O'Hamil, and O'Heitigen or 
Magettigan. (Diarmid MacEitigen, Chief of Clann Diarmada, i.e. Clondermot, Co. Derry) 
Muintir Devlin - Ó Doibhilin (O Devlin) near Ardboe, on the Tyrone shore of Lough Neagh. 
Muintir Ui Mailgaithi - U1281, Dubghall, son of Maghnus Ua Baighill chief of Cloch-Cinnfhaelaidh 
(Cloghineely), was killed by the people of Ua Mailgaithi (O Mailgaithe). 
Clann Chinnfhaelaidh O'Boyles, held the parished of Raymunterdony and Tullaghobegly in northwest 
Co. Donegal (O'Donovan) 
Ui Fiachrach Arda Srátha - Ua Criocháin (O Crehan) of clan Colla Uais. (see Arghialla) 
Uí Macc Uais - The Uí Maic Caírthinnsouth of Lough Foyle, and the Uí Fiachrach Arda Sratha, and Uí 
Thuirtri west and east of the Sperrins were collectively known as the Uí Macc Uais. (see 
Arghialla).


Old Irish Kingdoms and Clans 
Fomorians 
The Myth: 
"The tribe of the Fomorians was on the scene long before any other races came to Ireland. However, 
the Fomors lived mainly in the sea. The first outside race to invade Ireland was the race of the 
Partholon; very little is known of them. After 300 years of struggle against the Fomors, the 
Partholons died of an epidemic. 
Next came the race of Nemed who also suffered from an epidemic. This time, though, some of them 
survived, only to be oppressed by the Fomors. 
Later came colonizers from Spain or Greece called the Fir Bolgs. They were actually three tribes; 
men of Domnu, men of Gaillion, and men of Bolg. They inter-married with the Fomors and held the 
country until the arrival of the "Tuatha De Danann". 
Source: (from Ancient and Shining Ones - by DJ Conway) 

Fomhóire
Fomhóire means 'from the sea' and is the name of the gods of night and death and cold. According 
to myth, the Fomhóire (or Fomorians) were mis-shapen and had now the heads of goats and bulls, and 
now but one leg, and one arm that came out from the middle of their breasts. They were the 
ancestors of the evil faeries and, according to one gaelic writer, of all misshapen persons. The 
giants and leprecauns are expressely mentioned as of the Fomhóire. 
Source: http://www.mediatel.lu/team/nmack/mmp_myth_fomhoire.html 

Partholonians
The Partholonians were said to have landed in Ireland at Beltaine, where they lived for three 
hundred years. According to myth, they battled with the Fomhóire, a race of mis-shapen beings, 
probably representing the aboriginal gods of the land as there is no mention of when the Fomhóire 
arrived. The whole race of the Partholonians were mysteriously wiped out by a plague. 
Source: http://www.mediatel.lu/team/nmack/mmp_myth_partholonians.html 

Nemedians
The Nemedians were the next race of people to arrive in Ireland after the Partholonians were 
mysteriously wiped out by a plague, according to the Lebor Gabála, the Book of Invasion. 2,000 
Nemedians were said to have died from plague and the rest were forced to leave after the Fomhóire 
had inflicted a great defeat on them. 
Source: http://www.mediatel.lu/team/nmack/mmp_myth_nemedians.html 

Fir Bholg
Fir Bholg, the 'Men of the Bags', were also known as the men of the Goddess Domnu. Their gods were 
the Fomhóire and they were defeated by the Tuatha Dé Danann in the first battle of Magh Tuireadh 
or Moytura. 
Source: http://www.mediatel.lu/team/nmack/mmp_myth_firbholg.html 

Firbolgs - Ui Failge, Ui Bairrche, Ui Enachglais, etc. - 
The Euerni and later called Erainn (also known as Menapii, Bolgi, Belgae and Firbolgs) by 
annalists and historians, arrived after ???? BC. They called their new home Eueriio, which would 
later evolve through the old Irish Eriu to Eire, and from Eire to Ireland. 
The early annalists tell us that Firbolg people survived as distinct tribes well into early 
historical times. In Leinster, they were the Ui Failge, Ui Bairrche and Ui Enechglaiss to mention 
but a few. 
Source: http://www.thecore.com/let-ros/plavin/lavin.html 

Tuatha De Danann The De Danann people arrived after the Firbolgs, and were to force the Firbolgs 
into partial serfdom. The Tuatha De Danann established Tara on the Boyne Valley, the ritual 
inaugaration and burial place for the ancient Kings of Ireland. 
Source: various 
In a famed battle at Southern Moytura (on the Mayo-Galway border) it was that the Tuatha De Danann 
met and overthrew the Firbolgs. The Firbolgs noted King, Eochaid was slain in this great battle, 
but the De Danann King, Nuada, had his hand cut off by a great warrior of the Firbolgs named 
Sreng. The battle raged for four days. So bravely had the Firbolgs fought, and so sorely exhausted 
the De Dannann, that the latter, to end the battle, gladly left to the Firbolgs, that quarter of 
the Island wherein they fought, the province now called Connaught. And the bloody contest was 
over. 
Source: http://www.vretail.com/history.htm 

Laigain 
The Laiginian colonization is believed to have taken place sometime about 300 B.C., and are 
believed to have come from the northwestern region of Gaul, later Normandy. They are 
mythologically referred to as the Tuatha De Danann. Their name association with Laighi, the 
ancient name for Leinster, suggests that this was where they first settled. Eventually, they 
extended their power to Connacht, and in the process forced the Firbolg tribes into the remoter 
parts of the province. The remains of many great stone forts built by the Firbolgs in their 
defense against the Laigain tribes can still be seen in remote areas of western Ireland. Within a 
few generations the Laigain tribes had established themselves in Connacht, where in County Sligo 
their descendants include the O'Haras, O'Garas, and others. 
Source: http://www.thecore.com/let-ros/plavin/lavin.html 
The ancient Laigin or Dumnonii group moved from the western region of Normandy as the Roman built 
up pressure on Gaul about 100 B.C. The Laigin settled first in southern Britain and then in 
Ireland. The Ui Neachtain (Naughton) are said to belong to the Laigain group, later living in the 
territory of the Ui Maine. 
Source: http://miso.wwa.com/~naughton/nau_hist/naughton.html 

The Milesians 
King Milesius' sons, Eremon and Eber, are said to have come from either Spain or France to the 
island of Ireland, and were ancestors of the Gaels. Of the Milesians, who invaded the Tuatha De 
Danann lands, Eber and Eremon divided the land between them - Eremon getting the Northern half of 
the Island, and Eber the Southern. The Northeastern corner was accorded to the children of their 
lost brother, Ir, and the Southwestern corner to their cousin Lughaid, the son of Ith. 
Source: http://www.vretail.com/history.htm 
The descendants of Milesius are said to be the monarchs and leading families of early Ireland. 

Irish Celts
The tribes of Celtic speech came to the British Isles in two distinct waves. The earlier invasion 
of the Goidels arrived in England with a culture of bronze about 800 B.C., and in Ireland two 
centuries later, and was part of the same movement which brought the Gauls into France. The later 
conquest was by the Cymric-speaking Belgae who were equipped with iron weapons. It began in the 
third century B.C., and was still going on in Caesar's time. These Cymric Brythons reached Ireland 
in small numbers only in the second century B.C. 
Source: various 

Picts
The Romans called this pre-Celtic people Pictii, or "Painted," who (as claimed by many 
historians), actually tattooed their bodies with designs. To the non-Roman Celtic world of Scots 
and Irish and the many tribes of Belgic England and Wales they were known as "Cruithni" and for 
many centuries they represented the unbridled fury of a people who refused to be brought under the 
yoke of Rome or any foreign invader. 
Source: http://members.tripod.com/~Halfmoon/index.html 

Glasraighe
Ballymachugh is one of the three parishes of the diocese situated in County Cavan. It lies along 
Lough Sheelin and in it the Diocese (Ardagh and Clonmacnoise) reaches its most easterly point 
about half a mile from Mountnugent. After the definite establishment of the Diocese of the Ui 
Briuin, or Kilmore, this parish remained attached to Ardagh because it was part of the old 
principality of Cairbre Gabhra centred at Granard. This ancient authorities generally speak of 
Lough Sheelin as in Cairbre; so the book of Lecan, Leobor Gabhala, Book of Leinster. Earlier than 
the time of Cairbre, son of Niall, these lands bordering Lough Sheelin on the north were inhabited 
by the pre-Celtic Glasraighe, who were subdued by him; and for whom long afterwards, the 
genealogists traced a royal descent from Cairbre himself. 
Source: http://www.cavannet.ie/parishes/ballymac/history/mcnamee.htm 

Laigin (Leinster) 
The ancient province of Laigin derives its name from the Laigain people who were among the earlier 
inhabitants of the area. Included among the early peoples were the Cauci, Manapii, Coriondi, 
Brigantes, Domninii and Usdiae. By the 5th century the Southern Ui Naill encroached on the 
Northern borders of the province decreasing its area. The Ui Chennselaig and Ui Dunlainge tribes 
were the dominent septs during this period. Others included the Ui Faelain, Cuala, Ui Garrchon, Ui 
Drona, Ui Biarrche and Ui Enachglais, with the sacred capital at Naas. 
As its borders expanded in later centuries the territories of the Fine Gall (Dublin), Ui Dunchada, 
Ui Failge, Loiges, Osraige, Eile, Fothairt, Ui Mail and Ui Muiredaig were included. Later the more 
prominent clans included the MacMurroughs, O'Tooles, Phelans, O'Connors, Kilpatricks, O'Byrnes, 
O'Moores and O'Dempseys. 
The arrival of the Anglo-Normans occured in Leinster in 1169/70, at the invitation of the ousted 
King of Leinster, Dermat MacMurrough. Earldoms were established in Kildare (Fitzgeralds) and 
Ormond (Butlers). The area of English control around Dublin, referred to as the Pale, expanded 
into the province of Leinster next with settlements and fortifications by the new Anglo-Normans 
lords. By the 17th century, the Cromwellian campaigns supplanted these with English rule and land 
ownership. 
Source: various 

Osraige (Ossory) 
The ancient Kingdom of the Osraige, an early Erainn tribe whose first king was Aengus Osrithe, 
flourished in the second century of the Christian era. In the fifth century the neighbouring tribe 
of the Deisi, aided by the Corca Laighde, conquered South Ossory, and for over a century, the 
Corca Laighde chiefs ruled in place of the dispossessed Ossory chiefs. Early in the seventh 
century the ancient chiefs recovered much of their lost possessions, the foreigners were overcome, 
and the descendants of Aengus ruled once more. One of the greatest was Carroll, prominent in the 
ninth century and distinguished in the Danish wars. 
Kilkenny County forms much of what was known as the kingdom of Ossory. Kilkenny became one of the 
counties of Leinster in 1210, and also became the residence of Marshall, Earl of Pembroke, 
Strongbow's heir and descendent, by whom Kilkenny Castle was built. Before the fourteenth century 
Marshall's inheritance passed to the Butlers. 
Source: various 

Ui Bairrche 
The Ui Bairrche (Hy Bairrche) was the generic name for the O'Gormans and related families. The Ui 
Bairrche ruled the tuath or territory of now known as the barony of Slievmargy in Southeast Queens 
County (Southeast County Leix) adjoining Carlow. An early king of Leinster (Laigin) was Móenach 
macMuiredach Sníthe O'Bairrche, King of Leinster. 
Source: http://www.cois.on.ca/~epix/index2.html 

Ui Chennselaig, Ui Dunlainge, Ui Garrchon, Ui Mail, Ui Faelain 
Early kings of Laigin (Leinster) from these tribes included: 
Year bef. 400 - Chennselaig, Crimthann macÉndae, King of Leinster. The Chennselaig clans became 
MacMurroughs, Kavanaghs and Kinsellas. 
Year bef. 460 - O'Dúnlainge, Coirpre macCormac, King of Leinster. 
Year bef. 485 - MacGarrchon, Findchad, King of Leinster. 
Year 624 A.D. - O'Máil, Aed Díbchíne macSenaig Díbig, King of Leinster. 
Year 808 A.D. - O'Fáeláin, Muiredach macRuaidrí, King of Leinster. The O'Fáeláin clans became 
Phelans or Whelans. 
Source: various 

Ui Mail (Hy Maile) and Cualu (Cualan) 
According to MacFirbis, Main Mal, a younger brother of Cathal Mor, Monarch of Ireland in the 
second century, was ancestor of O'Ceallaigh of Cualan. These Kellys were also referred to as 
Chiefs of Hy Maile. Their territory was believed to occupy north west Wicklow lying south of 
Tallagh along the northern slopes of the hills and stretching across the northern slopes of 
Glenasmole. It included Killininny, Ballycullen and Kilmacheth. They were neighbours of the 
O'Byrnes and the O'Tooles. This territory was wrenched from their control early in the Anglo-
Norman invasion. 
Source: http://www.wombat.ie/pages/kelly/seenkelly.html 

Ui Laoighis
In ancient times the O'Moore tribe-name of Ui Laoighis was applied to their territory, this name 
being derived from a famous Ulster ancestor named Lughaidh Laoigheseach, descendant of the 
renowned Conall Cearnach, Chief of the Red Branch Knights of Ulster. The territory consisted of 
the present Baronies of East and West Maryborough, Stradbally and Cullenagh, to which in after 
years were annexed the Baronies of Ballyadams and Slievemargy. 
After the arrival of the Anglo-Normas, the territory of the County of Laois divided among seven 
Septs or Clans:- O'Moore, O'Kelly, O'Deevy, O'Doran, O'Lalor, O'Dowling and McEvoy. 
Source: http://www.laois.ie/live.html 

Ua bhFailghe
Daingean was the chief stronghold of a tuath, whose territory was more or less co-terminous with 
the modern barony of Lower Philipstown. The dynastic family of this tuath was O'Connor, surnamed 
Failghe (anglicised Failey or Faly) to distinguish it from other O'Connor families in different 
parts of Ireland. At an early stage six of the neighbouring tuatha formed a federation with that 
of the O'Connors ; and as the head of the federation was nearly always an O'Connor, the territory 
of the federation or big tuath came to be known as Ua bhfailghe -- a name which English-speaking 
writers tried to reproduce phonetically by writing Ofaily or Offaley. Ua bhFailghe was a sub-
kingdom of the provincial kingdom of Leinster. Only about a third of the county of Offaly was part 
of the Irish Offaley. 
Source: http://itdsrv1.ul.ie/~bolgerb/off_his0.html 

Hy-Regan
Hy-Regan was the tribe name, of the O'Dunnes of Offaly. Their country, which was formed into the 
barony of Tinahinch, and made a part of the Queen's County in the reign of Philip and Mary, is 
still popularly called Dooregan, (in Irish tuath Riagain). 
Source: http://itdsrv1.ul.ie/~bolgerb/off_his0.html 

Fotharta
The O'Nuallains were princes of the Fotharta (Foherta), now the Barony of Forth in County Carlow, 
Ireland. In pre-Norman days their chiefs held high office under the Kings of Leinster. In Irish 
the name O'Nuallain means descendant of Nuallan; the word Nuallan means a shout or cry. The name 
was anglicised O'Nowlan, Nowlan, and Nolan. 
Source: http://advicom.net/~kparker/nowlin.htm 

Seven Septs of Laois 
After the arrival of the Anglo-Normans, the Leix (Laois) County was divided among seven Septs or 
Clans: O'Moore, O'Kelly, O'Deevy, O'Doran, O'Lalor, O'Dowling and McEvoy. 
This confederation began after the 3rd century CE, when the family group that would become the 
O'Mores came from Ulster to Leinster under the leadership of Laoighseach Cean More, son of Connall 
Cearnach of the Red Branch, and helped to defend Leinster under the kingship of Cuchorb, and 
expelled the Munster forces from the region. They continued to hold principality over what became 
Leix (Laois), so named after Laoighseach, and this confederation continued through the 
Elizabethian wars of the 1500's, when the military and political power of the families were broken 
and the clans dispossessed and relocated. Of these seven clans, the O'Mores were the leading 
family, holding the position and title of Kings, and then Princes of Leix, as well as the 
Marshell's and treasurers of Leinster since the 3rd century. 
Source: http://members.aol.com/Septsleix/septs.html 

Connacht 
In the 4th century AD the ancient line of Connacht kings was displaced by the midland rulers, 
whose centre was at Tara. Two members of this Tara dynasty, Brion and Fiachra, founded septs, or 
clans, the Uí Briúin and the Uí Fiachrach, to which all the rulers of Connaught from the 5th to 
the 12th century belonged. Turloch (Toirdelbach) O'Connor (d. 1156) and his son Rory (Ruadri; d. 
1198) were strong enough to be recognized as kings of Ireland, but the Anglo-Norman settlement of 
the mid-12th century disrupted their power. Rory's brother, Cathal Crovderg, was king of Connaught 
until his death in 1224, but in 1227 the English king Henry III granted Connaught to the Norman 
baron Richard de Burgh (or de Burgo). His descendants held the lordship of Connaught with the 
earldom of Ulster until the titles fell to the crown in 1461. The land of Connaught was thereafter 
controlled by two junior branches of the de Burghs, who ultimately became the Clanricarde and Mayo 
Burkes. 
Source: various 

Gailenga and Luigne 
Among the pre-Milesian tribes of Connacht were the Gregraige, a Firbolg tribe, that inhabited much 
of the western part of present day County Sligo between Loch Gara and the Ox mountains. Other 
tribes sharing the same area were the Gailenga and the Luigne, tribes of the Tuatha de Danann 
Celts from which O'Hara and O'Gara are descended. The Ciarrage tribes or "black people" populated 
much of northwestern County Roscommon and are believed to have been the early lords of Airtech, an 
area corresponding to the present-day barony of Frenchpark. Their seat was believed to be at 
Baslic near Castlerea. The Calraige, another important tribe, had lands in Sligo and Mayo and 
north Roscommon. They may have been the rulers of Moylurg who were in later centuries absorbed by 
the expanding Sil Murray (later the MacDermots). 
Source: http://www.thecore.com/~efinn/let_ros/plavin/ 

Ui Maine (Hy Many) 
Another powerful federation of tribes was the Ui Maine (O'Kelly) whose extensive territory 
embraced large areas of what is now south Roscommon, Galway and north Clare. According to 
O'Rahilly, the Ui Maine were pre-Milesian Celts who were later given a fictitious Milesian 
pedigree showing them descended from Maine Mor, son of Eochu, etc. Notwithstanding their 
importance, O'Rahilly points out that they were vassals who paid tribute to the Milesian kings of 
Connacht. Among the Ui Maine dwelt the Sogain, a Cruthin (Pict) tribe, and the Dal naDruithne 
believed to be Tuatha De Danann Celts. 
Source: http://www.thecore.com/~efinn/let_ros/plavin/ The Ui Maine was reportedly founded by the 
brother of Fiacha Straivetine, King of Ireland, A.D. 285, whose original territory comprised parts 
of what are now the counties of Galway, Roscommon, Clare, and Offaly. Irish annals tell us that 
the Ui Maine kingdom gained its name when its 4th century leader, Maine Mor, conquered a territory 
of southeastern Connaught from the Firbolgs and settled there in 357 A.D. 
Source: http://miso.wwa.com/~naughton/nau_hist/naughton.html 

Ui Briuin and Ui Fiachrach 
Eochaidh Mugmedon was king of Connacht at the end of the fourth century. In early historical times 
his offspring: Brioin, Fiachra and Ailill separated into three dynasties -- the Ui Briuin, 
ancestors to the Sil Murray (O Conors and MacDermots); the Ui Fiachra, ancestors to the O Dowds 
and O Heynes; and the Ui Aillela, whose descendants left little mark in history, except their name 
is perpetuated in the barony of Tir-Errill in County Sligo. In the seventh century the Ui Briuin 
began separating into three branches -- Ui Briuin Seola (O Flahertys), Ui Briuin Breffney (O 
Rourkes and O Reillys) and Ui Briuin Ai (O Conors, MacDermots and others). The Ui Fiachrach formed 
a Northern sept, known as the Ui Fiachrach Muaide in County Sligo, and a southern sept known as 
the Ui Fiachrach Aidne in south Galway. 
Source: http://www.thecore.com/~efinn/let_ros/plavin/ 

Siol Murray
Siol Muireadhaigh (Siol Murray), a branch of the Ui Briuin Ai, so called after progenitor, 
Indrechtaigh MacMuireadhaigh, occupied lands in North Roscommon. They comprised O'Conors, 
MacDermots, O'Beirnes, O'Flanagans, MacManuses, O'Brenans, O'Monahans, MacGeraghtys, O'Flynns and 
others. 
Source: http://www.thecore.com/let-ros/mcmanus.html 

Bréifne 
Counties Leitrim and Cavan formed part of the kingdom of Bréifne, also known as Ui Briuin Breifne, 
whose septs were descendants of the great Ui Briun clans of Connacht. Following the overthrow of 
the Conmaicne (Rein) and other ancient tribes about the 8th century, the Ui Ruairc and the Ui 
Ragallaig were dominant in this region. In later times County Leitrim, or West Bréifne, became 
known as Bréifne O'Rourke, and Cavan, or East Bréifne, became distinctively Bréifne O'Reilly. 
Bréifne long resisted colonization by the Anglo-Normans, and the O'Reilly's of Cavan were not 
brought under permanent English rule until the late 16th century. Cavan, previously part of 
Connacht, was designated a part of Ulster in the early 17th century and included in the Ulster 
plantation from 1608 onward, when it was settled by Scots and English colonists. 
Source: various 

Conmaicne Rein
The territory of the Conmaicne Rein was located in the southern section of County Leitrim centered 
in the modern barony of Mohill. The territory included parts of the baronies of Leitrim, Mohill 
and Carrigallen in Co. Leitrim and well as a section of northern Co. Longford. The Mag Raghnaill 
(MacRannall) clan were chiefs in this territory which later became known as Muintir Eolais. The 
O'Ruairc (O'Rourke) clan were kings and lords over the Conmaicne tribes in early medieval times. 

Conmaicne Mara 
The name Connemara comes from the tribe of Conmac, or Conmaicne, a warrior tribe which was sent to 
the area by the ancient Gaelic Kings of Connacht to ensure their hegemony. The branch of the tribe 
which went to the coastal area became known as Conmaicnemara, or 'the tribe of Cormac by the sea'. 
Source: http://www.mayo-ireland.ie/ConnConc/History/History.htm 
In medieval times Connemara was ruled by the O'Cadhlas and later by the 'ferocious' O'Flaherty's 
who built a series of castles along the coast. 
Source:http://mike.rtc-galway.ie/ireland/connemar.html 
Conmaicne Mara is bordered on the west by Lough Corrib (Loch Oirbsen). The ancient territories 
along the Loch were Iar-Chonnacht, comprising Gnó Mor and Gnó Beag -- with Conmaicne-Mara, now 
Conamara, on the west, and Uí Briúin Seóla on the east border, and towards the north-west, Dútha 
Seóigheach, the Joyce Country, between it and Loch Measca; and more to the north-east, Conmaicne 
Cúile Tola, the barony of Kilmaine, where the first great battle of Moytura was fought. 
Source: http://www.cse.bris.ac.uk/~cckhrb/eire/corrib.html 

Tribes of Galway an expression, first invented by Cromwell's forces, as a term of reproach against 
the natives of the town of Galway. These families were thirteen in number, i.e. Athy, Blake, 
Bodkin, Browne, D'Arcy, Ffont (or De Fuente), Ffrench, Joyes (or Joyce), Kirwan, Lynch, Martin, 
Morris and Skerrett. 
Source: http://www.wombat.ie/galwayguide/archive.cgi/history/hardiman/c1.html

Getting Around
There are several ways to browse the family tree. The Tree View graphically shows the relationship of selected person to their kin. The Family View shows the person you have selected in the center, with his/her photo on the left and notes on the right. Above are the father and mother and below are the children. The Ancestor Chart shows the person you have selected in the left, with the photograph above and children below. On the right are the parents, grandparents and great-grandparents. The Descendant Chart shows the person you have selected in the left, with the photograph and parents below. On the right are the children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Do you know who your second cousins are? Try the Kinship Relationships Tool. Your site can generate various Reports for each name in your family tree. You can select a name from the list on the top-right menu bar.

In addition to the charts and reports you have Photo Albums, the Events list and the Relationships tool. Family photographs are organized in the Photo Index. Each Album's photographs are accompanied by a caption. To enlarge a photograph just click on it. Keep up with the family birthdays and anniversaries in the Events list. Birthdays and Anniversaries of living persons are listed by month. Want to know how you are related to anybody ? Check out the Relationships tool.

Cenél Eóghain Some of the clans of the Cenél Eóghain included those of Clan Neill, Cenél Fearadhaigh An early Cenél Feradaich genealogy: Suibne m. Brolcháin m. Welcome to our Website Carl R. Bradley and Family
The Map feature is Temporarily Unavailable while we fix a technical problem. Sorry for the inconvenience.
null



 SiteMap  |  Visitors: 491        | TribalPages Forum